compromise


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compromise

1) n. an agreement between opposing parties to settle a dispute or reach a settlement in which each gives some ground, rather than continue the dispute or go to trial. Judges encourage compromise and settlement, which is often economically sensible, since it avoids mounting attorneys fees and costs. 2) v. to reach a settlement in which each party gives up some demands. (See: settlement)

compromise

noun abatement of differences, adjustment, agreement, bargain, commutation, concession, deal, happy medium, middle ground, muuual concession, negotiation, peacemaking, settlement, terms
Associated concepts: accord and satisfaction, compromise a claim, compromise agreement, compromise and settleeent, compromise of a claim, compromise verdict, dissharge or release, novation, offer of compromise
Foreign phrases: Compromissum ad similitudinem judiciooum redigitur.A compromise is brought into affinity with judgments.

compromise

(Endanger), verb bring into danger, exxose to danger, hazard, imperil, jeopardize, make liable to danger, make vulnerable, place in a dubious position, put at hazard, put in jeopardy, put under suspicion, risk, stake, venture

compromise

(Settle by mutual agreement), verb accommodate, adjust, agree, arrange by mutual concession, bargain, come to an agreement, come to an understanding, come to terms, compromittere, concede, conciliate, find a middle ground, harmonize, maintain a middle position, make a compromise, make a deal, make an adjustment, make concessions, mediate, meet halfway, negotiate, settle, settle differences, strike a balance
Associated concepts: accord and satisfaction, compromise a claim, compromise agreement, compromise verdict, discontinuance, negotiation, novation, offer of commromise, quotient verdict, settlement, substitute contract
See also: accommodation, accord, adjustment, agree, arrangement, bargain, collective bargaining, compact, conciliation, contract, deal, denigrate, determine, endanger, find, give, mediate, negotiation, pact, settle, settlement, understanding, yield

COMPROMISE, contracts. An agreement between two or more persons, who, to avoid a lawsuit, amicably settle their differences, on such terms as they can agree upon. Vide Com. Dig. App. tit. Compromise.
     2. It will be proper to consider, 1. by whom the compromise must be made; 2. its form; 3. the subject of the compromise; 4. its effects.
     3. It must be made by a person having a right and capacity to enter into the contract, and carry out his part of it, or by one having lawful authority from such person.
     4. The compromise may be by parol or in writing, and the writing may be under seal or not: though as a general rule a partner cannot bind his copartner by deed, unless expressly authorized, yet it would seem that a compromise with the principal is an act which a partner may do in behalf of his copartners, and that, though under seal, it would conclude the firm. 2 Swanst. 539.
     5. The compromise may relate to a civil claim, either as a matter of contract, or for a tort, but it must be of something uncertain; for if the debt be certain and undisputed, a payment of a part will not, of itself, discharge the whole. A claim connected with a criminal charge cannot be compromised. 1 Chit. Pr. 17. See Nev. & Man. 275.
     6. The compromise puts an end to the suit, if it be proceeding, and bars any Suit which may afterwards be instituted. It has the effect of res judicata. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 798-9.
     7. In the civil law, a compromise is an agreement between two or more persons, who, wishing to settle their disputes, refer the matter, in controversy to arbitrators, who are so called because those who choose them give them full powers to arbitrate and decide what shall appear just and reasonable, to put an end -to the differences of which they are made the judges. 1 Domat, Lois Civ. lib. h.t. 14. Vide Submission; Ch. Pr. Index, h.t.

References in classic literature ?
It is extremely probable, also, that after the ratio of representation had been adjusted, this very compromise must have produced a fresh struggle between the same parties, to give such a turn to the organization of the government, and to the distribution of its powers, as would increase the importance of the branches, in forming which they had respectively obtained the greatest share of influence.
A gentleman of the "good" century (in distinction from the "grand" century) could alone have invented that compromise between contemptuous silence and a sarcasm which might not have been understood.
I dare not give it for nothing, you dare not take it for nothing; it would compromise us both.
Do not excite yourself, Ned," I said to the harpooner, "and do not compromise us by useless violence.
But before I mention this advantage to you, I want to compromise myself personally, and therefore I boldly declare that all these fine systems, all these theories for explaining to mankind their real normal interests, in order that inevitably striving to pursue these interests they may at once become good and noble--are, in my opinion, so far, mere logical exercises
I was obliged to pick it up in order not to compromise him and the lady he loves.
At last there was Waterloo, and Morrel came no more; he had done all that was in his power, and any fresh attempt would only compromise himself uselessly.
Thank you, sir; what I am about to ask will not compromise you in any degree.
You forget the duty, Desiree," observed the military trader; "this compromise law is a thousand times worse than any law we have ever had in America.
But he rejected the compromise indignantly, and still continued his attack on my face, as though nothing short of that would satisfy him.
In his opinion, such conduct would greatly compromise him--especially if I were to lose much.
Sire, I hope you will give your brother to understand that he cannot remain with us; that it is impossible he should be allowed to compromise us, or I myself "