compromise

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compromise

1) n. an agreement between opposing parties to settle a dispute or reach a settlement in which each gives some ground, rather than continue the dispute or go to trial. Judges encourage compromise and settlement, which is often economically sensible, since it avoids mounting attorneys fees and costs. 2) v. to reach a settlement in which each party gives up some demands. (See: settlement)

compromise

noun abatement of differences, adjustment, agreement, bargain, commutation, concession, deal, happy medium, middle ground, muuual concession, negotiation, peacemaking, settlement, terms
Associated concepts: accord and satisfaction, compromise a claim, compromise agreement, compromise and settleeent, compromise of a claim, compromise verdict, dissharge or release, novation, offer of compromise
Foreign phrases: Compromissum ad similitudinem judiciooum redigitur.A compromise is brought into affinity with judgments.

compromise

(Endanger), verb bring into danger, exxose to danger, hazard, imperil, jeopardize, make liable to danger, make vulnerable, place in a dubious position, put at hazard, put in jeopardy, put under suspicion, risk, stake, venture

compromise

(Settle by mutual agreement), verb accommodate, adjust, agree, arrange by mutual concession, bargain, come to an agreement, come to an understanding, come to terms, compromittere, concede, conciliate, find a middle ground, harmonize, maintain a middle position, make a compromise, make a deal, make an adjustment, make concessions, mediate, meet halfway, negotiate, settle, settle differences, strike a balance
Associated concepts: accord and satisfaction, compromise a claim, compromise agreement, compromise verdict, discontinuance, negotiation, novation, offer of commromise, quotient verdict, settlement, substitute contract
See also: accommodation, accord, adjustment, agree, arrangement, bargain, collective bargaining, compact, conciliation, contract, deal, denigrate, determine, endanger, find, give, mediate, negotiation, pact, settle, settlement, understanding, yield

COMPROMISE, contracts. An agreement between two or more persons, who, to avoid a lawsuit, amicably settle their differences, on such terms as they can agree upon. Vide Com. Dig. App. tit. Compromise.
     2. It will be proper to consider, 1. by whom the compromise must be made; 2. its form; 3. the subject of the compromise; 4. its effects.
     3. It must be made by a person having a right and capacity to enter into the contract, and carry out his part of it, or by one having lawful authority from such person.
     4. The compromise may be by parol or in writing, and the writing may be under seal or not: though as a general rule a partner cannot bind his copartner by deed, unless expressly authorized, yet it would seem that a compromise with the principal is an act which a partner may do in behalf of his copartners, and that, though under seal, it would conclude the firm. 2 Swanst. 539.
     5. The compromise may relate to a civil claim, either as a matter of contract, or for a tort, but it must be of something uncertain; for if the debt be certain and undisputed, a payment of a part will not, of itself, discharge the whole. A claim connected with a criminal charge cannot be compromised. 1 Chit. Pr. 17. See Nev. & Man. 275.
     6. The compromise puts an end to the suit, if it be proceeding, and bars any Suit which may afterwards be instituted. It has the effect of res judicata. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 798-9.
     7. In the civil law, a compromise is an agreement between two or more persons, who, wishing to settle their disputes, refer the matter, in controversy to arbitrators, who are so called because those who choose them give them full powers to arbitrate and decide what shall appear just and reasonable, to put an end -to the differences of which they are made the judges. 1 Domat, Lois Civ. lib. h.t. 14. Vide Submission; Ch. Pr. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
The agent makes a CD if she chooses A, because it means not observing R, and in so doing the compromiser accepts some loss of value within her behavior.
Identify your preferred style of dealing with conflict--determine whether you a competitor, collaborator, compromiser, avoider, or accommodator, and then challenge yourself to adapt your style to the situation.
Kemmis writes as a genuine compromiser and reformer; Behan makes radical arguments for a clean sweep.
It's an open question whether La Follette would have achieved more by being a compromiser, by softening his attacks on corporate power, or by muffling his voice during World War I.
One student reflected on collaboration saying, "I had to balance being an accommodator, compromiser, and collaborator.
The task seems even more difficult when the book moves from dogmatic to practical theology, for its author is not a natural trimmer or compromiser even on issues that perplex conservative Christians, never mind the rest of humanity.
The ferociously terse, lucid, and precise portrayal of the hero-historian verges on the blasphemous: he is a true cynic, an unprincipled, gutless compromiser, a cold manipulator, a ruthless womanizer who exploits every opportunity to his benefit.
Drawing on established negotiation and conflict management theory, he identifies the five personal styles: (1) the avoider, (2) the compromiser, (3) the accommodator, (4) the competitor, and (5) the problem solver.
As we all know, it takes a leader, a conciliator, a compromiser, a strong person, to head a diverse group of independent-minded academics.
Tasso is, in Looney's view, the "ultimate compromiser," consistently "blending sources" in his epic poem, be they biblical, classical or vernacular.
For all his rhetorical belligerence, Churchill had to make compromises, and the way of the compromiser is dangerous, as the examples of Gandhi, Sadat, and Rabin suggest.
The men's names are more familiar: Maximilien Robespierre, the utopian idealist who, once in power, becomes the author of the bloodbath called the Terror; Georges Danton, opportunist and compromiser, Robespierre's comrade and sometime opponent; and Nicolas Condorcet, aristocrat, feminist and intellectual, who believes in the principle of constitutional law above all.