compromise

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compromise

1) n. an agreement between opposing parties to settle a dispute or reach a settlement in which each gives some ground, rather than continue the dispute or go to trial. Judges encourage compromise and settlement, which is often economically sensible, since it avoids mounting attorneys fees and costs. 2) v. to reach a settlement in which each party gives up some demands. (See: settlement)

compromise

noun abatement of differences, adjustment, agreement, bargain, commutation, concession, deal, happy medium, middle ground, muuual concession, negotiation, peacemaking, settlement, terms
Associated concepts: accord and satisfaction, compromise a claim, compromise agreement, compromise and settleeent, compromise of a claim, compromise verdict, dissharge or release, novation, offer of compromise
Foreign phrases: Compromissum ad similitudinem judiciooum redigitur.A compromise is brought into affinity with judgments.

compromise

(Endanger), verb bring into danger, exxose to danger, hazard, imperil, jeopardize, make liable to danger, make vulnerable, place in a dubious position, put at hazard, put in jeopardy, put under suspicion, risk, stake, venture

compromise

(Settle by mutual agreement), verb accommodate, adjust, agree, arrange by mutual concession, bargain, come to an agreement, come to an understanding, come to terms, compromittere, concede, conciliate, find a middle ground, harmonize, maintain a middle position, make a compromise, make a deal, make an adjustment, make concessions, mediate, meet halfway, negotiate, settle, settle differences, strike a balance
Associated concepts: accord and satisfaction, compromise a claim, compromise agreement, compromise verdict, discontinuance, negotiation, novation, offer of commromise, quotient verdict, settlement, substitute contract
See also: accommodation, accord, adjustment, agree, arrangement, bargain, collective bargaining, compact, conciliation, contract, deal, denigrate, determine, endanger, find, give, mediate, negotiation, pact, settle, settlement, understanding, yield

COMPROMISE, contracts. An agreement between two or more persons, who, to avoid a lawsuit, amicably settle their differences, on such terms as they can agree upon. Vide Com. Dig. App. tit. Compromise.
     2. It will be proper to consider, 1. by whom the compromise must be made; 2. its form; 3. the subject of the compromise; 4. its effects.
     3. It must be made by a person having a right and capacity to enter into the contract, and carry out his part of it, or by one having lawful authority from such person.
     4. The compromise may be by parol or in writing, and the writing may be under seal or not: though as a general rule a partner cannot bind his copartner by deed, unless expressly authorized, yet it would seem that a compromise with the principal is an act which a partner may do in behalf of his copartners, and that, though under seal, it would conclude the firm. 2 Swanst. 539.
     5. The compromise may relate to a civil claim, either as a matter of contract, or for a tort, but it must be of something uncertain; for if the debt be certain and undisputed, a payment of a part will not, of itself, discharge the whole. A claim connected with a criminal charge cannot be compromised. 1 Chit. Pr. 17. See Nev. & Man. 275.
     6. The compromise puts an end to the suit, if it be proceeding, and bars any Suit which may afterwards be instituted. It has the effect of res judicata. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 798-9.
     7. In the civil law, a compromise is an agreement between two or more persons, who, wishing to settle their disputes, refer the matter, in controversy to arbitrators, who are so called because those who choose them give them full powers to arbitrate and decide what shall appear just and reasonable, to put an end -to the differences of which they are made the judges. 1 Domat, Lois Civ. lib. h.t. 14. Vide Submission; Ch. Pr. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
But all politicians have to make compromises, and so do voters.
Therefore it was not only a question of raw interests, and it would be misguided to look upon these compromises as mere examples of bartering.
Margalit bases On Compromise and Rotten Compromises on two lectures he gave at Stanford University in 2005.
But the fraud threat continues, from petty crimes to large-scale compromises, making a battle plan for the next compromise essential for credit unions.
A detailed report of all actionable compromises is provided for quick remediation.
2 of the Internal Revenue Manual (IRM) points out that such compromises will be rare, because it would undermine Congress's will if the IRS found that particular tax statutes were unfair.
As public officials continue to wrestle with hot-button issues ranging from abortion to gay rights to the death penalty, they may find thinner ranks of citizens supporting compromise.
Americans who attend church regularly are less likely than others to accept the need for compromise in political matters, a new poll shows.
As a result, government agencies are not being kept informed of possible compromises of their information.
He rejects the advances of Rosamond, who has become bored with her husband and he leaves Middlemarch after Casaubon's death not to compromise Dorothea (Semmel 94).
Another factor that can complicate matters is the way in which a patient copes with the primary symptoms of speech compromise.
Such conflict compromises productivity, saps the energy of participants and affected parties, reduces the joy in work, and contributes to the consumption of antacids.