conclusion


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conclusion

n. 1) in general, the end. 2) in a trial, the end of all evidence has been introduced and final arguments made, so nothing more can be presented, even if lawyer thinks of something new or forgotten. 3) in a trial or court hearing, a final determination of the facts by the trier of fact (jury or judge) and/or a judge's decision on the law. (See: conclusion of fact, conclusion of law)

conclusion

(Determination), noun adjudication, ascertainment, assessment, authoritative opinnon, conclusio, consideration, decision, declaration, decree, deduction, derived principle, discernment, estimation, evaluation, final judgment, finding, inference, judgment, observation, opinion, persuasion, pronouncement, reasoned judgment, report, resolution, resolve, result, result ascertained, result of judicial inquest, ruling, settling, solution, surmise, valuation, verdict, view
Associated concepts: conclusion as to intent, conclusion as to motive, conclusion of a trial, conclusion of guilt, conclusion of innocence, conclusion of law, conclusion of mixed law and fact

conclusion

(Outcome), noun cessation, close, completeness, completion, conclusio, consequence, consequent, consummation, culmination, denouement, effect, effectuation, end, end product, end result, ending, eventuality, final result, finale, finalty, finis, finish, fulfillment, last stage, outcome, outgrowth, product, repercussion, resultance, resultant action, termination, upshot
Foreign phrases: Ab abusu ad usum non valet consequentia.A conclusion as to the use of a thing from its abuse is invalid. Inclusio unius est exclusio alterius. The inclusion of one is the exclusion of another. In propria causa nemo judex. No one can be judge in his own cause. Negatio conclusionis est error in lege. The denial of a conclusion is in error in law.
See also: adjudication, alternative, amount, belief, cessation, choice, concept, consequence, conviction, death, decision, defeasance, denouement, destination, determination, development, diagnosis, discernment, discharge, disposition, divorce, end, expiration, extremity, finality, finding, generalization, holding, inference, judgment, observation, opinion, option, outgrowth, payoff, performance, persuasion, point of view, position, result, ruling, termination, verdict

conclusion

1 an admission or statement binding on the party making it; ESTOPPEL.
2 the close of a pleading or of a conveyance. See also CONCLUSIONS.

CONCLUSION, practice. Making the last argument or address to the court or jury. The party on whom the onus probandi is cast, in general has the conclusion.

CONCLUSION, remedies. An estoppel; a bar; the act of a man by which he has confessed a matter or thing which he can no longer deny; as, for example, the sheriff is concluded by his return to a writ, and therefore, if upon a capias he return cepi corpus, he cannot afterwards show that he did not arrest the defendant, but is concluded by his return. Vide Plowd. 276, b; 3 Tho. Co. Litt. 600.

References in periodicals archive ?
Mas papaniwalaan ko ang ating gobyerno kesa sa taong dumating na lang dito at nagsasalita na may conclusion agad even in the absence of a formal investigation,' he added.
The need to document a conclusion not readily determinable from the documentation.
The NAS/NRC report reviewing the DTSE & E's study concluded that "in addition to providing examples of cost savings and cost avoidance that resulted from the use of M & S in acquisition, the study reinforced some of the conclusions and recommendations of prior studies.
Here, the statements are simply joined with equal weight, without any indication that the second is the conclusion mentioned in the first.
If the IRS has a mere reasonable basis for taking a contrary position and the advice relates to an issue that has a significant tax effect on the transaction, any written advice expressing a more likely than not (or stronger) conclusion would be subject to the mandatory requirements.
With the exception of the modeling papers, most articles are well referenced with conclusions clearly supported by the data furnished.
Thacker's analysis is bolstered by multiple approaches, particularly a sociological one; however, the author engages with psychological, feminist, and anthropological theories as well, thereby demonstrating broad knowledge of critical theories and allowing him to reach his own conclusions.
Instead, they trumpet the fact that they reached similar conclusions when they applied the same troubled analysis to other measures of student performance, such as SAT scores and drop-out rates.
14) The overall conclusion that Jesus was a mystic instead of an apocalyptic only partially answers the historical question about the nature of his movement.
11 aftermath and identifying losses (and gains) that should be classified as extraordinary would be very difficult, and reasonable people could come to very different conclusions.
Certainly, non-Christians, who still constitute a significant majority of the human race two millennia after the founding of Christianity, would undoubtedly reject the Christian soteriology that supports the otherwise unsavory behavior directed by conclusion A.