conclusions


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conclusions

in Scottish civil procedure, that part of a summons that sets out what the pursuer seeks.
References in classic literature ?
Wallace, who is now studying the natural history of the Malay archipelago, has arrived at almost exactly the same general conclusions that I have on the origin of species.
Playmore (arriving at Gleninch, as usual, every evening on the conclusion of his labors in the law) was consulted as to the handwriting.
When they prove to you that in reality one drop of your own fat must be dearer to you than a hundred thousand of your fellow-creatures, and that this conclusion is the final solution of all so-called virtues and duties and all such prejudices and fancies, then you have just to accept it, there is no help for it, for twice two is a law of mathematics.
This little dialogue is a perfect piece of dialectic, in which granting the common principle,' there is no escaping from the conclusion.
It would seem that not much consideration was needed to reach this conclusion, nor any particular care or trouble on the part of the Emperor and his marshals, nor was there any need of that special and supreme quality called genius that people are so apt to ascribe to Napoleon; yet the historians who described the event later and the men who then surrounded Napoleon, and he himself, thought otherwise.
And yet, in conclusion, I can well say that I wish my forefathers had banished John Barleycorn before my time.
He made accurate examination of it by the aid of some instruments, and came to the conclusion that it was carved from a lump of lodestone.
With this conclusion we may leave the emotions and pass to the consideration of the will.
Now Michael could not reason to this conclusion nor think to this conclusion, in words.
If she won't give me the information I want, the conclusion is obvious -- I must help myself.
And that is what I mean when I say that in all states there is the same principle of justice, which is the interest of the government; and as the government must be supposed to have power, the only reasonable conclusion is, that everywhere there is one principle of justice, which is the interest of the stronger.
As soon as I was composed enough to think, I arrived at one distinct conclusion in reference to the otherwise incomprehensible visitor who had favoured me with a call.