condescendence


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Related to condescendence: sporadic, felicitation, capricious, altercation

condescendence

in Scottish civil procedure, that part of either a summons or an initial writ that sets out the facts founded on.
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Tout d'abord pour ce que regarde Philippe nous admetrons voluntiers quil avait le dessein parfaitement arrete de reprendre un j our la lutte contre Rome, et que su condescendence momentanee aux ordres du Senat couvrait chez lui une haine des plus violentes (Colin, 1905: 377).
Other regulations also reinforced this situation, like the normative of 23 August, 1938, which repealed the Republican law of 1931, which prohibited the sale of contraceptives; and the normative of 24 January, 1941, which criminalised abortion under any circumstances; and the Law of 19 July, 1944, which ordered the reform of the Republican Criminal Code to criminalise adultery and common-law unions, without admitting extenuating circumstances for female infidelity, but showing condescendence towards unfaithful men or crimes of passion motivated by the jealousy of the deceived husband.
Sobolev considers the scholarly literature on Hopkins with great care and strives to deal fairly with his predecessors, while deprecating "several secular critics" who, taking what they understand as Hopkins' "orthodoxy" for granted, "think that this gives them the right to perceive him with condescendence, to consider him one of those who are detached from 'real life', whatever this mysterious collocation means" (24).
Too much of past mission history and present mission endeavours has been and is shaped by condescendence and feelings of superiority on the side of those engaged in mission.
The passive viewer's perspective (8) leads to idea that the viewer is not complementary to a specialist, due to his condescendence to 'brains' and 'experts', who are able to think.
Others will find traces of colonial condescendence in the portrayal of French Christian monks as social and medical benefactors of indigent Algerian Muslim villagers.