confidence trick

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He is unsuccessful at drawing away their selfish interest in the confidence man to his own more familiar phrases from the New Testament.
The confidence man now enters the fray, sensing that the old miser is not doing so well against the skeptical Show-me Missourian.
Dowd was the master confidence man when it came to nurturing great music.
The subtitle of this book might more descriptively have been taken from the title of its first chapter: "The American Spy Considered as a Confidence Man.
Scotty is a confidence man and he just shrivelled - in the second half he wasn't in the game.
In next week's episode, she must track down a confidence man who escapes from her responsibility via the women he has seduced; that a Leonard Cohen song serves as a plot point gives you an idea of the hipster cool that percolates throughout this series (the show employs David Holmes' funky ``Out of Sight'' score).
The significance of Melville's inversion of the Satanic hero becomes apparent in the final chapter of The Confidence Man.
For Ishmael it is Father Mapple, a man of faith who, like Jonah, is "an anointed pilot-prophet, or speaker of true things" and who holds out "Delight,--top-gallant delight" for repentant sinners (47, 48); for Ahab it is Fedallah who, although his name suggests "faith," is a riddling pilot--a confidence man who tells unrepentant Ahab that, despite his recurring dream of hearses, "neither hearse nor coffin can be thine" but that, "if it come to the last, I shall still go before thee thy pilot" (498-99).
Four weeks after making and sticking to a new year resolution, Billy has led me from an 11 stone 10lbs excuse-maker in a three piece suit to 10 stone 3lbs, supremely confidence man no longer fearful of the fact he'd just turned 31.
The confidence man is a stock figure in American culture, originating perhaps not coincidentally--in the boomtowns of the Old Southwest.
Smith, a presidential candidate in 1948 who polled all of 10,000 votes on the vegetarian ticket; "Major" Jones, a confidence man of the easy lie; and Brown, a hotel owner with no guests.