conflate


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Some express feeling more hopeful after seeing and hearing the message (a presence also rendered less there by being broken down and shown in fragments throughout the film), using language that conflates the image of the Dalai Lama with the leader himself; monks mention Buddhist temples that have been destroyed--ruinous, palpable reminders of the absence of freedom; and villagers in traditional Tibetan garb are contrasted with urban youth dressed in Western clothing, who, when asked, offer the year 2000 as the year Tibet lost its freedom.
As for the corrections: 1) only about a fifth of the 250-page collection previously appeared in Meyer's other Jargon books; 2) "Rilke" translates and conflates part of the Sixth Duino Elegy, along with most of the First Duino Elegy; 3) "Venetian Epigrams" consists of "tracings" (Meyer's word) of the early Goethe poem of the same name; 4) "Trois Baguettes" is not influenced--as I seem to indicate, though unintentionally--by Jack Sharpless, who was in college in 1972 when it was written.
He also advocates encouraging divisions, and using international organizations to weaken the Muslim and especially Arab countries - Huntington often conflates the two even though Arabic speaking people represent at best 17% of the world's Muslim population.
I have previously argued that within an argument to show that we cannot perceive the causes of our sensations, Berkeley's Philonous conflates a psychological and an epistemic sense of 'immediately perceive,' and uses the principle of perceptual immediacy (PPI), that whatever is perceived by the senses is immediately perceived.
Language-free, they engage instead in a play of ultra-chic styling that conflates, for instance, the Arcadian longings of William Morris's organic patterning with the arch machine-age geometries of the Wiener Werkstatte, protopsychedelia and retro-futurism, accentuated with the exposed seams of early-'80s DIY pop culture.
Television, he argues, also conflates what should be the separate worlds of adults and children, with destructive results.
Throughout her film, Klodawsky conflates interviews with elderly couples who were ironically brought together by the Holocaust with archival footage and ultra--romantic re--enactments of her subjects' experiences.
Thus, in his funeral homily for Ben Black Elk (200-204), the author conflates the "Black Elk tradition" with his own catechesis about Christ and the pipe.
Part of his Moby Dick series, which includes almost 300 works made between 1986 and 1997 now housed in collections around the world, this work conflates painting and sculpture--though it hangs on the wall and is painted, it is made of metal forms and is three-dimensional.
In her attempt to conjure a lethal subculture that fostered Cunanan's values, Orth selectively combs the gay world and conflates her "findings" into sensational generalizations that not so subtly encompass all gay men.
He conflates `moral authority' and legal liability, whereas the sole point at issue in the actual case was the latter.
The Enterprise Web Suite, which conflates portal, search, collaboration and content management technologies, allows companies to create a variety of Collaborative Business Environments and applications, with strict adherence to the Basex One Environment Rule.