consummation of marriage


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consummation of marriage

full sexual intercourse between married persons after their marriage by the insertion of the penis into the vagina. Inability to consummate because of impotence or refusal to consummate is a ground for nullity of the marriage.

CONSUMMATION OF MARRIAGE. The first time that the husband and wife cohabit together, after the ceremony of marriage has been performed, is thus called.
     2. The marriage, when otherwise legal, is complete without this; for it is a maxim of law, borrowed from the civil, law, that consensus, non concubitus, facit nuptias. Co. Litt. 33; Dig. 50, 17, 30; 1 Black. Com. 434.

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Even before the birth of a child, however, medical science could provide an objective sign of the consummation of marriage.
The fourth manifestation of custom is the escape of the bride, who detested the groom chosen for her, from his tent on the morning following the consummation of marriage.
Starting with the consummation of marriage, which begins the spiritual oneness that transforms two people into one, the authors share frank words about activities of the bedchamber in connection with scripture, with the hope all people can transform their marriages.
There was a little difference in the age at the marriage, age at the consummation of marriage and age at the birth of first child between the two groups of respondents, the scheduled castes being at the low level in terms of all the three variables.
The harassment includes demand for dowry, cruelty, abandonment of the woman on foreign shores and non- consummation of marriage, among others," she added.
The ultimate thesis of this book is that the gift of sexual intimacy has four main purposes: consummation of marriage, procreation, love, and pleasure.
When the consummation of marriage takes place five years later, she will be just 15 while her husband will be in his 80s
In and around La Rochelle, many westerners, within various ranks of rural and urban society, commonly regarded clergymen, Catholic or Calvinist, as devious practitioners of the blackest magic, as sorcerers capable of causing hailstorms, infesting fields with vermin, sickening farm animals, and sabotaging the vital consummation of marriages.