contrived


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Some of the more knowing Crows, perceiving this, stole quietly to the camp, and, unobserved, contrived to stop the touch-holes of the field-pieces with dirt.
It felt that, in spite of all possible pains, It had somehow contrived to lose count, And the only thing now was to rack its poor brains By reckoning up the amount.
I told him what had happened, and how I had contrived to put off the inevitable disclosure for a time.
The utmost malice of Fortune could, indeed, have contrived nothing so cruel, so mal-a-propos, so absolutely destructive to all his schemes.
I surpassed myself, the suffering one; I carried mine own ashes to the mountain; a brighter flame I contrived for myself.
Then they contrived for themselves their by-paths and bloody draughts!
But why she had spoken of old Madame Vrede, whom she had to go and see, as she had to see many other people, she could not have explained; and yet, as it afterwards turned out, had she contrived the most cunning devices to meet Vronsky, she could have thought of nothing better.
And it was not the necessity of concealment, not the aim with which the concealment was contrived, but the process of concealment itself which attracted her.
When he spoke of you and the other lady, and said it seemed contrived by Heaven, or the devil, against him, that Oliver should come into your hands, he laughed, and said there was some comfort in that too, for how many thousands and hundreds of thousands of pounds would you not give, if you had them, to know who your two-legged spaniel was.
The lethargic youth contrived without any additional rousing to set out two card-tables; the one for Pope Joan, and the other for whist.
Miller, who, not being quite so much absorbed as he ought to have been, contrived to commit various high crimes and misdemeanours, which excited the wrath of the fat gentleman to a very great extent, and called forth the good-humour of the old lady in a proportionate degree.
The patter between numbers, including a labored bit in which the star serves cheese and crackers to the audience, seems to be contrived only to give McKenzie's pipes a well-deserved break.