convict

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Convict

To adjudge an accused person guilty of a crime at the conclusion of a criminal prosecution, or after the entry of a plea of guilty or a plea of nolo contendere. An individual who has been found guilty of a crime and, as a result, is serving a sentence as punishment for the act; a prisoner.

convict

1) v. to find guilty of a crime after a trial. 2) n. a person who has been convicted of a felony and sent to prison.

convict

noun accused, accused person, bad example, captive, condemned person, condemned prisoner, criminal, crook, culprit, defaulter, defendant, delinquent, desperado, desperate criminal, escapee, evildoer, felon, first offender, guilty man, guilty person, inmate, internee, jail inmate, lawbreaker, malefactor, malevolent, malfeasant, malfeasor, miscreant, misdemeanant, misfeasor, offender, outlaw, parolee, prisoner, prisoner at the bar, prisoner behind bars, prisoner of state, public enemy, recidivist, recreant, reprobate, rogue, scoundrel, sinner, thief, transgressor, villain, wrongdoer
Associated concepts: certificate of relief from disabilities

convict

verb attaint, bring to justice, call to account, cast blame upon, censure, condemn, condemn after judicial investigation, declare guilty of an offense, denounce, doom, find against, find guilty, find liable, give a guilty verdict, hold liable, hold responsible, impose a penalty on, inflict a penalty on, inflict punishment, pass censure on, pass sentence on, penalize, prescribe punishhent, pronounce judgment, pronounce sentence, punish, put the blame on, sentence, utter judicial sentence against
Associated concepts: convict of a crime, convict of wronggoing, sentence
See also: captive, condemn, criminal, felon, hoodlum, inmate, lawbreaker, malefactor, outlaw, prisoner, punish, recidivist, sentence

convict

to pronounce (someone) guilty of an offence or the person found guilty of an offence especially one who is sentenced to imprisonment. A person who has been convicted has a conviction. Subject to various rules this previous conviction may appear as part of a person's criminal record which is usually brought to the attention of a sentencing court at the time of sentence. Subject to various other rules and depending on the legal system it may or may not be brought to the attention of a court in a later case during the trial. Such rules are required because the existence of a conviction may result in prejudice - especially if it is for a similar matter.

CONVICT. One who has been condemned by a competent court. This term is wore commonly applied to one who has been convicted of a crime or misdemeanor. There are various local acts which punish the importation of convicts.

References in periodicals archive ?
Across England and Wales, there were 873 people in 2015/16 who were convicted of offences under the Animal Welfare Act, down 18% from the 1,064 people who were convicted in 2014/15.
West Yorkshire Police said from 2013 onwards, 10 police officers and one PCSO were convicted of criminal offences.
Dyfed-Powys Police said a male PC was convicted of criminal damage to leisure items in 2012.
Jennifer Bradley-Smith, 24, of Melbourne Road, Earlsdon, was convicted in her absence of keeping an unlicensed vehicle.
Jade Baker, 20, of Matthysens Way, St Mellons, was convicted in her absence of exceeding a 30mph limit and fined pounds 60 with a pounds 15 victim surcharge and given three penalty points.
In November 2004 he was convicted of stealing a smoke alarm from B&Q in Washington.
They were each convicted and sentenced to10 years imprisonment and fined seven hundred thousand Afghanis, the statement said.
Ian Brady, 71, convicted with Myra Hindley of three Moors Murders in 1966.
Though he faced many charges of corruption and would be convicted for contempt of court during the mid-1920s, when he served as the county sheriff, Hoffman prosecuted particular kinds of homicide cases aggressively, staking his political fortunes on crusades to protect the innocent.
Drug offenders were 32 percent of felons convicted in state courts in 2002.
The Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania ruled on December 26, 2000, that the Pennsylvania law prohibiting convicted felons from registering to vote for five years after their release from prison is unconstitutional.