correspondents


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See: press
References in classic literature ?
In the ease of Turlington's house, the foreign merchants had drawn their bills on him for sums large in the aggregate, if not large in themselves; had long since turned those bills into cash in their own markets, for their own necessities; and had now left the money which their paper represented to be paid by their London correspondents as it fell due.
By the same sign, which, at the same time, tells my right-hand correspondent that I am ready, while it gives notice to my left-hand correspondent to prepare in his turn.
Tell me, should you have the misfortune to turn your head while your right-hand correspondent was telegraphing" --
Your correspondent," Razumov said in an almost openly mocking tone.
It was really the idea of her correspondent, but Sophia Antonovna had adopted it fully.
My correspondent has just left Miss Ladd," the doctor answered.
Meanwhile he held on to his modest position in a mercantile house in New Orleans, where an equal familiarity with English, French and Spanish gave him no small value as a clerk and correspondent.
Loscombe's correspondent -- the nephew of the gentleman who owns this house, and whose charity has given me an asylum, during the heavy affliction of my sickness, under his own roof.
Setting his own interests out of the question, Hardyman owed obligations to the kindness of his illustrious correspondent which made it impossible for him to send an excuse.
Hardyman might, in that case, plead with his Imperial correspondent for a delay in his departure of a few days more; and th e marriage might still take place before he left England.
There the name of the widow was, unquestionably; figuring for the second time in type, in a letter of the gossiping sort, supplied by an "Occasional Correspondent," and distinguished by the title of "Sayings and Doings in the North.
Considerable sensation (the correspondent announced) had been caused in Perth and its neighborhood, by the exposure of an anonymous attempt at extortion, of which a lady of distinction had lately been made the object.