corroboration


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corroboration

noun acknowledgment, assurance, attestation, authentication, averment, avouchment, bearing out, certification, circumstantiation, conclusive evidence, conclusive proof, confirmation, demonstration, documentation, endorsement, establishment of proof, evidence, fortification, legal evidence, presentation of evidence, proof, ratification, strengthening, substantiation, support, supportability, supporting evidence, sustaining, testification, testimony, validation, validification, verifiability, verification, vindication, voucher, witness
Associated concepts: corroborating circumstances, corroborattng evidence, corroborative proof, corroborative testimony
See also: avowal, certainty, certification, confirmation, consent, documentation, evidence, ratification

corroboration

the doctrine in the law of evidence that material facts require to be proved by evidence from two independent sources as, for example, two eyewitnesses or one witness and facts and circumstances. It is often said to be very important in preventing miscarriages of justice, but the fact is often overlooked that the effect of a rule on corroboration maybe to produce two lying witnesses instead of just one. Then, if the lies are not exposed, the effect on a jury is all the stronger. Its benefit is that if two witnesses are lying it should be easier to catch them out. The story of Susanna and the Elders in the Book of Daniel in the Bible has entrenched the idea in the Judaeo-Christian world. Even in Scots criminal law, which holds the doctrine in high esteem, the rigour of the rule is relaxed in relation to confessions that show a special knowledge of the crime that only the perpetrator would know. There are many statutory relaxations of the rule both in England and Scotland. It is seldom required in either jurisdiction in civil cases. See also MOOROV DOCTRINE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lamont claimed that, when "valid concerns" about the abolition of corroboration were raised by both the legal profession and a Holyrood committee, these were "dismissed" by MacAskill.
That's precisely the sort of corroboration of his students' work that revs up McGrath, who instructed them to research illegal immigration beyond books, government reports and other conventional, bound sources.
This shows that corroboration of satellite data, using kites or other means, ought to be routine, Distler says.
We do not give too much credence to this sort of report, because there is no corroboration and we don't want to raise the hopes of the families, only to have them dashed.
This investigation and evaluation should begin with an inquiry of management, followed-up ordinarily with corroboration by other evidential matter.
This is an important corroboration from customers of our 'answers, not excuses' multivendor customer services philosophy," said John Rando.
The spy plane was shot down while he was in Russia, but no, the KGB wasn't interested in him, and in corroboration a KGB agent conveniently defected and came to Washington to tell us exactly that right after the assassination.
Sermo tracks the most talked about topics and reports the community's corroboration or opposition in real-time.
IF Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill hadn't gone overboard in his defence of the Bill to end corroboration in Scottish courts, he wouldn't feel so humiliated this morning.
This project aims to strengthen national capacities designed to consolidate the outer limit of the continental shelf Argentina, performing technical tasks necessary to obtain support and corroboration data for the analysis stage by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf instituting well as current concepts of the subject in the relevant agencies throughout society and Argentina
Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill has revealed he is considering scrapping corroboration rules, which currently mean key evidence in criminal trials has to come from at least two sources.