corruptness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to corruptness: debauched
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The ineptness and the corruptness of civilian leaders, leading to repeated military takeovers, have left Pakistan bankrupt both politically and economically.
Notwithstanding the highly refined tastes he developed--Wood reports that no American knew more about wine--Jefferson was distinguished by his fervent belief in the virtue of ordinary people, in the corruptness of powerful central governments, and in the need to keep the state small and at a distance to allow the people's natural sociability to guide their affairs.
According to Hagman, "Ceausescu had put three hours on TV--two were of political speeches, and one hour was an episode of Dallas--to show the corruptness of America.
A century ago, the books which formed the intellectual food of the great bulk of Englishmen, betray, at once, the feebleness of their appetites, and the corruptness of their tastes.
In my once-held view, those who had tried to expose the corruptness and oppressive condition of pre-socialist Western life were exaggerating middle-class, capitalist malevolence because of the circumstances of their youth and because of their perpetual search for a "fascist" enemy after their experience with the Nazis.
Later in the century, portraiture often became a marker of artistic failure or corruptness, as with Henry Gowan in Little Dorrit.
Indonesia tripled per capita incomes in thirty years, despite being run by a regime of almost unbelievable greed and corruptness.
While the Enron, Tyco and WorldCom cases might support the corruptness theory, in reality, the increase in lawsuits goes back to 1999, beginning with the dot-com collapse.