countertendency


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Art becomes an image not directly by becoming an apparition but only through the countertendency to it" (Aesthetic Theory 81).
Arguably, in this moral debate we can discern a countertendency toward an affirmation of the jus in bello principle of noncombatant immunity, and a less permissive view about the right to war.
At the same time, in pondering recent answers to Frost's query to twentieth century poets--"what to make of a diminished thing"--I also find a countertendency that I would call Neoromantic in the work of poets like Roethke, Lowell, Berryman, Olson, Duncan, Everson, Levertov, Rich, Berry, Snyder.
For Heidegger there is, of course, a fundamental choice built into this confrontation of Dasein with its being-toward the possible: Dasein either accepts authentically its existence in the openness of the possible as a task, or it flees inauthentically its ownmost sense as a task by immersing itself in its countertendency to forget, to obscure what is at stake in its confrontation with itself.
One sees the strongest countertendency to this union in those Islamic countries, such as Iran, with the most westernized ruling classes.
55) The literary trend to the very contrary was, then, like the flip side of public consciousness--a latent countertendency at odds with familial values fairly entrenched in Europe's social instincts and attitudes, and outwardly flourishing as never before.
However, in the face of the tendency toward privatization, there is an important countertendency toward the defense of public institutions.
On the one hand, there is a countertendency to protect the poetic texts, as it were, from Heidegger's elucidations, to show that he does philological violence to the integrity of these texts or makes them say something quite different from what they mean to say.