court of equity


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Related to court of equity: injunction, Stare decisis

court of equity

n. originally in English common law and in several states there were separate courts (often called chancery courts) which handled lawsuits and petitions requesting remedies other than damages, such as writs, injunctions, and specific performance. Gradually the courts of equity have merged with courts of law. Federal bankruptcy courts are the one example of courts which operate as courts of equity. (See: equity, chancery, court of law)

References in periodicals archive ?
Still, plaintiffs in a court of equity were required to at least state
In discussing the AIA in 1903, the Pacific Steam Whaling Court equated the AIA with traditional rules of equity and described the rule as follows: "Something more than mere illegality is necessary to justify the interference of a court of equity.
historically, a court of equity would have granted the relief had
Snell rejected the notion of judicial conscience and discretion, stating in his introductory chapter that "[a] court of equity is bound by settled rules as completely as a court of common law.
confusing, for instance, for a court of equity, whose jurisdiction
The court of equity was required when a party requested special remedies.
A bankruptcy court is a court of equity and it has very broad powers to assist you in terminating contracts and restructuring your costs," Anderson said during an interview on CNBC.
The Court of Equity (also called Chancery) was set up by the King to relieve against the strictness of the common law.
7) Therefore, the COFC declined to impute the broker's knowledge to the bidder to tarnish it with "unclean hands" and thus prevent it from recovering in a court of equity.
For example, the Court has recognized laches as an equitable defense and has held that a court of equity will not act in a manner that will "aid in the enforcement of a forfeiture" or act to help a plaintiff who has "unclean hands," he said.
In addition to personal liability of directors, a court of equity may enjoin the transaction in question.