court of inquiry

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court of inquiry

a group of people appointed to investigate the causes of a disaster or accident.

COURT OF INQUIRY. A court constituted by authority of the articles of war, invested with the power to examine into the nature of any transaction, accusation, or imputation against any officer or soldier; the said court shall consist. of one or more officers, not exceeding three, and a judge advocate, or other suitable person, as a recorder, to reduce the proceedings and evidence to writing, all of whom shall be sworn to the performance of their duty. Art. 91. Gord. Dig. Laws U. S., art. 3558 to 3560.

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The reasons vary from case to case, but individuals could seek courts of inquiry because they believe there is corruption or potential conflicts of interest in the legal or law enforcement institutions they would otherwise turn to.
Critics argue that courts of inquiry violate the Fifth Amendment right to trial by jury, but based on the Supreme Court decision in Hurtado v.
Importantly, courts of inquiry do not have the power to sentence those whom they investigate.
Courts of inquiry have "no authority for declaring someone innocent after death," he told the Tribune via e-mail.
Previous courts of inquiry have led to broader policy changes.