credits


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References in classic literature ?
If any of them get stuck, you go around yourself and guarantee their credit with the butchers and grocers.
Tabitha Twitchit immediately raised the price of everything a half-penny; and she continued to refuse to give credit.
How can it ever possess either energy or stability, dignity or credit, confidence at home or respectability abroad?
The young woman was placed in one of the waiting-rooms of the station, whilst Passepartout was charged with purchasing for her various articles of toilet, a dress, shawl, and some furs; for which his master gave him unlimited credit.
As the count's title sounded on his ear he rose, and addressing his colleagues, who were members of one or the other Chamber, he said, -- "Gentlemen, pardon me for leaving you so abruptly; but a most ridiculous circumstance has occurred, which is this, -- Thomson & French, the Roman bankers, have sent to me a certain person calling himself the Count of Monte Cristo, and have given him an unlimited credit with me.
It soothed, but it could not console her for the contempt which had thus been self-attracted by the rest of her family; and as she considered that Jane's disappointment had in fact been the work of her nearest relations, and reflected how materially the credit of both must be hurt by such impropriety of conduct, she felt depressed beyond anything she had ever known before.
He acknowledged no such inducement, and his sister ought to have given him credit for better feelings than her own.
You know that I am anxious to have that commission of lady of honor, which I have been foolish enough to ask of you, and you do not use your credit.
In his last letter he actually gave me some particulars of her behaviour at Langford, such as he received from a gentleman who knew her perfectly well, which, if true, must raise abhorrence against her, and which Reginald himself was entirely disposed to credit.
Oolanga was the only one who did not credit her with at least some sense of fine feeling in the matter.
And certainly it is the nature of extreme self-lovers, as they will set an house on fire, and it were but to roast their eggs; and yet these men many times hold credit with their masters, because their study is but to please them, and profit themselves; and for either respect, they will abandon the good of their affairs.
A government may be changed either into an oligarchy, democracy, or a free state; when the magistrates, or any part of the city acquire great credit, or are increased in power, as the court of Areopagus at Athens, having procured great credit during the Median war, added firmness to their administration; and, on the other hand, the maritime force, composed of the commonalty, having gained the victory at Salamis, by their power at sea, got the lead in the state, and strengthened the popular party: and at Argos, the nobles, having gained great credit by the battle of Mantinea against the Lacedaemonians, endeavoured to dissolve the democracy.