crying


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Related to crying: tears
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Responding to a newborn's crying results in a more contented baby who will cry less after six months of age," says Dr.
But when they give a close-up shot of the parents in the audience, my crying changes up another gear to a mild sob.
Whatever method a parent tries to stop a baby's crying, do it long enough so that it becomes ``boring'' for the infant, advises Jones; the repetition has a lulling effect.
It seems that things haven't changed quite that much though - men still feel uncomfortable about crying in front of the lads with only 29% admitting to crying in front of one of their close male friends.
Being depressed may blunt the crying response over time and disrupt the [coordination of] sad feelings, says study coauthor Jonathan Rottenberg, a Stanford graduate student.
In every other animal that seems to be extent of their function, but in humans, crying takes on a whole new, additional significance.
According to the emotions crying is a social signal to that we need help, but we not be shy or embarrassed being teary.
One of the funnier aspects of the Kleenex survey proved that if crying does make you a wimp, then southerners live up to their soft jessy stereotype.
When a woman cries it is often the full works,' he said, 'whereas men's crying tends to be a bit pathetic.
It's not so bad in the daytime, but when my partner comes home from work her crying gets on his nerves.
The artist is crying and too sad to tell anyone why.
Make a mess of the Moses story, and synagogues, mosques, and congregations around the country could be crying sacrilege--and perhaps boycott.