cudgel

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Related to cudgels: bludgeoning
References in classic literature ?
I will lay by my trusty bow and eke my arrows, and if thou darest abide my coming, I will go and cut a cudgel to test thy manhood withal.
I am content," said the other, "for verily you now have the best end of the cudgel.
The cudgel was swinging in the arc which ended upon my upturned face when a bolt of myriad-legged horror hurled itself through the doorway full upon the breast of my executioner.
The good dame had remained sulky ever since, whereupon Pierre, seeing no other mode of exorcising the evil spirit out of her, and being, perhaps, a little inspired by whiskey, had resorted to the Indian remedy of the cudgel, and before his neighbors could interfere, had belabored her so soundly, that there is no record of her having shown any refractory symptoms throughout the remainder of the expedition.
One carried a gun and the other a hatchet, and they scrutinised him and his cudgel scornfully.
I grasped my cudgel more firmly and unslung my javelin, carrying it in my left hand.
That the cat did not turn and rend Tarzan is something of a miracle which may possibly be accounted for by the fact that twice when it turned growling upon the ape-man he had rapped it sharply upon its sensitive nose, inculcating in its mind thereby a most wholesome fear of the cudgel and the ape-beasts behind it.
The owner went up after him and quickly drove him down, beating him severely with a thick wooden cudgel.
The chapman broke a rough jest as he passed, and the woman called shrilly to Alleyne to come and join them, on which the man, turning suddenly from mirth to wrath, began to belabor her with his cudgel.
With that assurance he took his cudgel from the corner of the room, and stalked out swiftly by the back door of the house into the night.
Tom answered, he could in duty refuse him nothing; but as for that tyrannical rascal, he would never make him any other answer than with a cudgel, with which he hoped soon to be able to pay him for all his barbarities.
I stopped before leaving Knowlesbury and bought a stout country cudgel, short, and heavy at the head.