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References in classic literature ?
Gertrude made him a little bow, and idly knocked the balls about with her cue.
Only when he thought of Miss Mackenzie there fell upon his mind a shadow of regret; that young lady was worthy of better things than plain John Nicholson, still known among schoolmates by the derisive name of 'Fatty'; and he felt, if he could chalk a cue, or stand at ease, with such a careless grace as Alan, he could approach the object of his sentiments with a less crushing sense of inferiority.
However, she had allowed me to fire up without correcting me, and from that I concluded that it was my cue to fire up, and to conceal the fact that I had been playing on her behalf.
His comrades all took their cue from him, and not an otter-skin was to be had at a reasonable rate.
And however that may be, we take the cue from no one.
I am ten leagues deep in calamity,' cried the Mahratta, picking up the cue.
It was not his cue to appear at all conscious of the high honor he thus unexpectedly enjoyed; but, by leading his guest into the conversation, to elicit some important ethical ideas, which might, in obtaining a place in his contemplated publication, enlighten the human race, and at the same time immortalize himself - ideas which, I should have added, his visitor's great age, and well-known proficiency in the science of morals, might very well have enabled him to afford.
his cue for the big speech in Act III His mind no longer dwelt on the fact that Arthur Mifflin, an estimable person in private life, and one who had been a friend of his at Cambridge, preferred to deliver the impassioned lines of the great renunciation scene in a manner suggesting a small boy (and a sufferer from nasal catarrh at that) speaking a piece at a Sunday-school treat.
I didn't have to wait for their cue, if that's what you mean, sir.
I assure you they knew their cue, did these gentlemen-- wonderful
You put chalk there when you play billiards, to steady the cue.
Each captain then had to fall back upon individual action and his own devices; one would see triumph in what another read as a cue for flight and despair.