date

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date

noun assigned time, day, day of the week, dies, marked time, moment, particular point of time, period, peeiod of time, point of time, specified period of time, time, time during which anything occurs
Associated concepts: certainty of date, date certain, date of acceptance, date of acknowledgment, date of applicaaion, date of appointment, date of availability, date of award, date of birth, date of commencement of action, date of death, date of default, date of enactment, date of execution, date of final judgment, date of injury, date of issue, date of loss, date of maturity, date of notice, date of publication, date of sale, date of taking, date on which a cause of action accrues, delivvry date, due date, effective date, expiration date, filing date, future date, publication date, return date, termination date
Foreign phrases: I n omnibus obligationibus in quibus dies non ponitur, praesenti die debetur. In all obligations in which no time is designated for their payment, the obligaaion is due immediately.

date

verb affix a date to, appoint the time of, ascerrain the time of, assign a time to, calendar, chronologize, fix the date, fix the time, furnish with a date, mark the time of, note the time of, reckon from some point in time, record, register, rem tempore tribuere, rem tempori adsignare, set the date, time
Associated concepts: post date
See also: age, appointment, meeting, rendezvous

DATE. The designation or indication in an instrument of writing, of the time, and usually of the time and place, when and where it was made. When the place is mentioned in the date of a deed, the law intends, unless the contrary appears, that it was executed at the place of the date. Plowd. 7 b., 31 H. VI. This word is derived from the Latin datum, because when deeds and agreements were written in that language, immediately before the day, month and year in which they were made, was set down, it was usual to put the word datum, given.
     2. All writings ought to bear a date, and in some it is indispensable in order to make them valid, as in policies of insurance; but the date in these instruments is not inserted in the body of the writing because as each subscription makes a separate contract, each underwriter sets down the day, month and year he makes his subscription. Marsh. Ins. 336.
     3. Deeds, and other writings, when the date is an impossible one, take effect from the time of deliver; the presumption of law is, that the deed was dated on the day it bears date, unless, as just mentioned, the time is impossible; for example, the 32d day of January.
     4. The proper way of dating, is to put the day, month, and year of our Lord; the hour need not be mentioned, unless specially required; an instance of which may be taken from the Pennsylvania Act of the 16th June, 1836, sect. 40, which requires the sheriff, on receiving a writ of fieri facias, or other writ of execution, to endorse thereon the day of the month, the year, and the hour of the day whereon he received the same.
     5. In public documents, it is usual to give not only the day, the month, and the year of our Lord, but also the year of the United States, when issued by authority of the general government; or of the commonwealth, when issued under its authority. Vide, generally, Bac. Ab. Obligations, C; Com. Dig, Fait, B 3; Cruise, Dig. tit, 32, c. 20, s. 1-6; 1 Burr. 60; 2 Rol. Ab. 27, 1. 22; 13 Vin. Ab. 34; Dane's Ab. Index, h.t. See Almanac.

References in classic literature ?
1869, the movement rather suddenly collapsed, although there have been sporadic outbreaks of the same sort since that date.
For an instant he dared not look, but Monsieur Thuran, who had leaned nearer to see the date, exclaimed that he was safe.
Spider was the first to see the date, and ere any knew what his intention was he raised himself to his feet, and lunged over the side of the boat, to disappear forever into the green depths beneath--the coin had not been the 1875 piece.
We must persist to the last in hunting down the date of Laura's journey.
You mean," said Marian, "the discovery that Laura did not leave Blackwater Park till after the date of her death on the doctor's certificate?
In that case, she must have started on the twenty-sixth, and must have come to London one day after the date of her own death on the doctor's certificate.
We know that his departure followed Laura's after the lapse of a few hours, and we may get at the date in that way.
Dawson's books certainly showed when he had resumed his attendance on Miss Halcombe at Blackwater Park, but it was not possible to calculate back from this date with any exactness, without such help from Mrs.
In a year from the date of her illness, the frail little child of the old days at Greenwater Broad had ripened, in the bracing Scotch air and the healthy mode of life, into a comely young woman.
The prisoner at the bar called at my shop on the date indicated on my register, some days later than the date indicated in the register of Mr.
I never received any arsenic from the prisoner, or from any one else, at the date to which you refer, of at any other date.
We have resolved that whenever the date of his death comes round we'll bow our heads and pronounce his name at the hour of his funeral.