de facto

(redirected from de facto segregation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to de facto segregation: de jure, de jure segregation

De Facto

[Latin, In fact.] In fact, in deed, actually.

This phrase is used to characterize an officer, a government, a past action, or a state of affairs that must be accepted for all practical purposes, but is illegal or illegitimate. Thus, an office, position, or status existing under a claim or color of right, such as a de facto corporation. In this sense it is the contrary of de jure, which means rightful, legitimate, just, or constitutional. Thus, an officer, king, or government de facto is one that is in actual possession of the office or supreme power, but by usurpation, or without lawful title; while an officer, king, or governor de jure is one who has just claim and rightful title to the office or power, but has never had plenary possession of it, or is not in actual possession. A wife de facto is one whose marriage is Voidable by decree, as distinguished from a wife de jure, or lawful wife. But the term is also frequently used independently of any distinction from de jure; thus a blockade de facto is a blockade that is actually maintained, as distinguished from a mere paper blockade.

A de facto corporation is one that has been given legal status despite the fact that it has not complied with all the statutory formalities required for corporate existence. Only the state may challenge the validity of the existence of a de facto corporation.

De facto Segregation is the separation of members of different races by various social and economic factors, not by virtue of any government action or statute.

de facto

adj. Latin for "in fact." Often used in place of "actual" to show that the court will treat as a fact authority being exercised or an entity acting as if it had authority, even though the legal requirements have not been met. (See: de facto corporation, de jure)

de facto

adjective absolutely, actual, actually, as a matter of fact, authentic, bona fide, certain, demonstrable, existent, existing, existing in fact, factual, genuine, in existence, in fact, in point of fact, in reality, positively, real, substantive, tangible, true, truly, unquestionable, valid, veritable, well-founded, well-grounded, with validity
Associated concepts: de facto administrator, de facto admissions, de facto apprenticeship, de facto appropriation, de facto authority, de facto board, de facto board of directors, de facto contract, de facto contract of sale, de facto corpooation, de facto court, de facto director, de facto dissolution, de facto districts, de facto domicile, de facto government, de facto guardian, de facto judge, de facto officer, de facto trust, de facto trustee
See also: actual, bodily, material, physical

DE FACTO, i. e. in deed. A term used to denote a thing actually done; a president of the United States de facto is one in the exercise of the executive power, and is distinguished from one, who being legally entitled to such power is ejected from it; the latter would be a president de jure. An officer de facto is frequently considered as an officer de jure, and his official acts are of equal validity. 10 S. & R. 250; 4 Binn. R. 371; 11 S. & R. 411, 414; Coxe, 318; 9 Mass. 231; 10 Mass. 290; 15 Mass. 180; 5 Pick. 487.

References in periodicals archive ?
110) The Court has also held that the Federal equal protection clause forbids states from barring local governments from using busing to remedy mere de facto segregation.
In another facet of de facto segregation, many sports facilities could also be deemed off limits to migrant workers.
In Part II, I explore how the Court has sometimes used de facto segregation as evidence of de jure discrimination in school districts that had been (but were no longer) segregated by law.
The situation in the West Bank required a critical examination because what was emerging was a kind of de facto segregation with unequal distribution of resources and great burdens of inconvenience between separated enclaves, said one of the experts.
We discussed the pitfalls of stereotyping and I encouraged them to analogize the condition of the Roma people to the struggles of Black Americans in the context of de facto segregation and de jure segregation.
While Los Angeles didn't have the racial divide of the South, there was still de facto segregation, notes Erin Clancy, associate curator at Skirball.
I think it is time to state that there is no constitutional difference between de jure and de facto segregation, for each is the product of state actions or policies.
Or to put it more accurately, Williams enables the players in this important history to narrate their tale and in so doing they tell a story that reaches back to the Great Depression era of de jure segregation and spans the postwar decades of increasing de facto segregation.
The academy noted the impact of Stone's editorials on unequal funding for urban and suburban school districts and de facto segregation in Connecticut.
The women's life stories revealed the effects that poorly funded schools, de facto segregation, teen childbearing, inadequate health care, cultural norms for work expectations, and a declining industrial base in the region may have on creating and maintaining disparities.
the Board of Education that segregating students based on race was illegal, de facto segregation still exists, not only in school populations across the country, but throughout the larger culture as well.