instinct

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The research attempts an interdisciplinary integrative approach of employing Freudianism, particularly the life and death instincts to interpret psychological facets of selected stories, and hermeneutic interpretation.
But this meant that in some obscure way the instinct toward self-preservation and the death instinct were homologous.
Moreover, Freud's theory concerning the life and death instincts suggests not only that the organism is inherently divided in seeking both to perpetuate and to shorten its own existence, but that "it wishes to die only in its own fashion" (Beyond 39).
Freud describes the interplay of the life instinct and the death instinct (Eros-Thanatos).
Unless, as Freud qualifies it, the reality principle intervenes, this nirvana principle, this death instinct, becomes the goal of life.
At the behest of the life instinct the ego splits off and projects the death instinct outwards.
Among some of the major concepts discussed in this paper were: castration anxiety, fear of loss of love, the death instinct, and the role of the defense mechanisms (especially denial).
Human Hope and the Death Instinct (1971) takes Freud, Sartre, and R.
There is also the aspect of thanatos, the death instinct.
It is where the urge to build and prosper crashes headlong, albeit at a snail's pace, into its opposite: the death instinct.
In a 1943 manuscript entitled "The Pattern of Organic Life in America," Smith noted: "All monumental architecture is an objectification of the death instinct.
Frequent allusions in Journal en miettes to this theory, and especially to Freud's hypothesis of the death instinct (which Ionesco appears to accept uncritically),(7) juxtaposed with references to Le Roi se meurt, including some early notes for the play(8) and the purpose of its composition ('pour que j'apprenne a mourir'),(9) strongly suggest the existence of a link in the playwright's mind between Freud's theory of instincts and the play.