deception


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deception

n. the act of misleading another through intentionally false statements or fraudulent actions. (See: fraud, deceit)

deception

noun artifice, beguilement, blind, bluff, camouflage, charlatanry, cheat, chicane, chicanery, con, counterfeit, cozenage, craft, craftiness, cunning, deceit, decoy, defraudation, defraudment, delusion, device, disguise, dishonesty, dissimulation, dodge, double-dealing, dupery, duplicity, equivocation, fabrication, fake, false appearance, false front, falsehood, falseness, falsification, feint, forgery, fraud, fraudulence, fraudulency, guile, hoax, illusion, imposition, imposture, indirection, insincerity, intrigue, knavery, legerdemain, lie, machination, masquerade, mendacity, mirage, obliquity, pretext, prevarication, rascality, roguery, ruse, sham, simulacrum, snare, stratagem, subterfuge, trap, trepan, trick, trickery, trickiness, trumpery, untruth, untruthfulness, unveracity, wile
Associated concepts: confusion, deception doctrine
Foreign phrases: Non decipitur qui scit se decipi.He is not deceived who knows that he is being deceived. Decipi quam fallere est tutius. It is safer to be deceived than to deceive.
See also: artifice, bad faith, canard, collusion, color, contrivance, corruption, counterfeit, deceit, decoy, disguise, dishonesty, distortion, duplicity, evasion, fallacy, falsehood, falsification, figment, forgery, fraud, hoax, hypocrisy, imposture, indirection, knavery, lie, maneuver, misrepresentation, misstatement, pettifoggery, plot, pretense, pretext, ruse, sham, sophistry, story, stratagem, subreption, subterfuge, trick

deception

in English criminal law it is an offence to obtain property by deception. It is committed by deceiving, whether deliberately or recklessly, by words or conduct as to fact or law, including the person's present intentions. It is also an offence to obtain services in this way.
References in classic literature ?
So that I can show your own hand for the very deception you accused me--without proof--of having practiced on you.
All the time he kept smiling and putting his tongue out in the most guilty, embarrassed manner, so that a child could have told that he was bent on some deception.
You seem to forget that I am married, and the one charm of marriage is that it makes a life of deception absolutely necessary for both parties.
The two princesses now planned out their future action, and agreed to combine to keep up the deception and to let Badoura continue to play a man's part until such time as there might be news of the real Camaralzaman.
Let him who has been deceived complain, let him give way to despair whose encouraged hopes have proved vain, let him flatter himself whom I shall entice, let him boast whom I shall receive; but let not him call me cruel or homicide to whom I make no promise, upon whom I practise no deception, whom I neither entice nor receive.
It is impossible not to bestow the imputation of deliberate imposture and deception upon the gross pretense of a similitude between a king of Great Britain and a magistrate of the character marked out for that of the President of the United States.
But he found himself encompassed with guards and forced to remain silent while the Chief Circle in a few impassioned words made a final appeal to the Women, exclaiming that, if the Colour Bill passed, no marriage would henceforth be safe, no woman's honour secure; fraud, deception, hypocrisy would pervade every household; domestic bliss would share the fate of the Constitution and pass to speedy perdition.
That is certainly a very pretty deception," said the doctor's friends; carelessly, however, for they had witnessed greater miracles at a conjurer's show; "pray how was it effected?
To keep up the deception as to his force, he ordered, at night, a number of extra fires to be made in his camp, and kept up a vigilant watch.
In short, his whole attire was that of a common driver of a hack carriage; and no one who had not previously received an intimation that his character was different from his appearance, would at all have suspected the deception.
Men, professors or coal-heavers, are easily deceived; they even have an extraordinary knack of lending themselves to deception, a sort of curious and inexplicable propensity to allow themselves to be led by the nose with their eyes open.
It cannot be doubted that Sir Walter and Elizabeth were shocked and mortified by the loss of their companion, and the discovery of their deception in her.