decide

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decide

v. for a judge, arbitrator, court of appeals or other magistrate or tribunal to reach a determination (decision) by choosing what is right and wrong according to the law as he/she sees it.

decide

verb adjudge, adjudicate, adjust, agree, arrive at a judgment, ascertain, award, choose, choose a course of action, choose an alternative, choose an option, come to a conclusion, come to an agreement, come to terms, commit oneself, conclude, constituere, decernere, decree, determine, diagnose, diiudicare, dispose of, elect, end, establish, finalize, find, fix, form a resolution, form an opinion, hold, judge, make a choice, make a decision, make a selection, make up one's mind, opt, ordain, pass, pass judgment, pass sentence, pick, pronounce, reach a decision, reach a verdict, referee, resolve, rule, select, sentence, settle, sit in judgment, terminate, umpire, vote
Associated concepts: decide a case, decide a motion, deeided adversely, decided as a matter of law, decided on the merits, decided upon legal principles, jurisdiction to decide
See also: adjudge, adjudicate, arbitrate, ascertain, award, choose, deem, determine, dispose, elect, find, fix, gauge, hear, judge, pass, pass judgment, prescribe, pronounce, select, sentence, settle, stipulate, try
References in periodicals archive ?
Henzinger, Probabilistic Automata on Infinite Words: Decidability and Undecidability Results, Springer-Verlag, 6252(2010), 1-16.
In a logic which--axiomatically--cannot definitely determine something of a thing, denial of decidability is still affirmation, as "false", of an assertion "It is" (oppositely, in affirming undecidability one asserts something "Is not" as "true").
Such temporal models have decidability problems: the most general interval-based temporal extension of DL is undecidable (Artale & Franconi, 2000).
They were haunted by a systematicity that included the publishing agenda of the national organization, the distribution of tracts through the network of colportage, colporteurs gathering data and measuring the effects of reading, the auxiliary societies then measuring the results of these measurements, national officials receiving and translating this knowledge into further matters of decidability surrounding what tracts would be produced and when, where to distribute them, how to measure their effects, what to tell colporteurs and why.
Eleven regular papers and eight short papers share recent work on computational complexity and decidability, query processing and data mining, proof systems for temporal reasoning, tree-like structures, and verification of infinite-state systems.
As critics who purport to be literary, we can and we must do more than think about such conundrums of decidability as if the poem were mere language.