dedication


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Dedication

In Copyright law the first publication of a work that does not comply with the requirements relating to copyright notice and which therefore permits anyone to legally republish it. The gift of land—or an Easement, that is, a right of use of the property of another—by the owner to the government for public use, and accepted for such use by or on behalf of the public.

The owner of the land does not retain any rights that are inconsistent with the complete exercise and enjoyment of the public uses to which the property has been committed.

A dedication is express where the gift is formally declared, but it can also be implied by operation of law from the owner's actions and the facts and circumstances of the case.

A dedication may be made under Common Law or pursuant to the requirements of statute. A common-law dedication is not subject to the Statute of Frauds, an English Law adopted in the United States, which provides that certain agreements must be in writing. Therefore, a common-law dedication does not have to be expressed in writing to be effective; it is based on Estoppel. If the landowner indicates that his or her land is to be used for a public purpose and public use then occurs, the landowner is estopped, or prevented, from refuting the existence of the public right.

An express common-law dedication is one in which the intent is explicitly indicated—such as by ordinary deeds or recorded plats, which are maps showing the locations and boundaries of individual land parcels subdivided into lots—but the execution of the dedication has not been in accordance with law or certification of it has been defective so as not to constitute a statutory dedication.

A statutory dedication is necessarily express, since it is executed pursuant to, and in conformity with, the provisions of a statute regulating the subject. It cannot be implied from the circumstances of the case.A dedication can result from the contrary exclusive use of land by the public pursuant to a claim of right with the knowledge, actual or attributed, and the acceptance of the owner. This method is known as dedication by adverse user.

dedication

n. the giving of land by a private person or entity to the government, typically for a street, park or school site, as part of and a condition of a real estate development. The local county or city (or other public body) must accept the dedication before it is complete. In many cases there are "dedicated" streets on old subdivision maps which were never officially accepted and, in effect, belong to no one. The adjoining property owners can sue for a judgment to give them the title to the unclaimed (unowned) street or property (quiet title action) or request abandonment by the government which did not accept the street or other property. (See: quiet title action)

dedication

noun bestowal, celebration, devotion, endowment, enshrinement, giving, gratuity, honoring, immortalization, inscription, offering, ordination, philanthropy, presentation, presentment, setting apart, setting aside for a particular purpose, solemn appropriation
Associated concepts: act of dedication, actual dedication, appropriation for a public use, appropriation of a charitable use, common-law dedication, constructive dedication, dedication by estoppel, dedication of property for public use, dedication to a charitable use, dedication to a public use, express dedication, implied dedication, irrevocable dedication, manner of dedication, private dedication, pubbic dedication, public easement, revocation of offer of deddcation, statutory dedication, unaccepted dedication
See also: adherence, devotion, inscription, loyalty

DEDICATION. Solemn appropriation. It may be expressed or implied.
     2. An express dedication of property to public use is made by a direct appropriation of it to such use, and it will be enforced. 2 Peters, R. 566; 6 Hill, N. Y. Rep. 407.
     3. But a dedication of property to public or pious uses may be implied from the acts of the owner. A permission to the public for the space of eight or even six years, to use a street without bar or impediment, is evidence from which a dedication to the public may be inferred. 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1631; 11 East, R. 376; 12 Wheat. R. 585; 10 Pet. 662; 2 Watts, 23; 1 Whart. 469; 3 Verm, 279; 6 Verm. 365; 7 Ham. part 2, 135; 12 Wend. 172; 11 Ala. R. 63, 81; 1 Spencer, 86; 8 Miss. R. 448 5 Watts & S. 141; Wright, 150; 6 Hill, 407 24 Pick. 71; 6 Pet. 431, 498 9 Port.,527; 3 Bing. 447; sed vide 5 Taunt. R. 125. Vide Street, and the following authorities: 3 Kent, Com. 450; 5 Taunt. 125 5 Barn. & Ald. 454: 4 Barn. & Ald. 447; Math. Pres. 833. As to what shall amount to a dedication of an invention to public use, see 1 Gallis. 482; 1 Paine's C. C. R. 345; 2. Pet. R. 1; 7 Pet. R. 292; 4 Mason, R. 1018. See Destination.

References in classic literature ?
The exercises connected with the dedication were held in Music Hall, in Boston, and the great hall was packed from top to bottom with one of the most distinguished audiences that ever assembled in the city.
May I point out, by presenting you with this dedication, that in the meantime I am become the parent of the Book?
With the quickness of David at the switch, I slipped a blotting-pad over the dedication, and then, "Pray be seated," I said coldly, but she remained standing, all in a twitter and very much afraid of me, and I know that her hands were pressed together within the muff.
The truth is, I begun to think uncomfortably of the dedication.
But there was still that accursed dedication, lying, you remember, beneath the blotting-pad.
Ma'am," said I, swelling, "it is a Dedication," and I walked majestically to the window.
Yes, I had always known that this was the one flaw in my dedication, but how could I have expected her to have the wit to see it?
Why, you have commended the book so warmly, that you should be ashamed of reading your name before the dedication.
Indeed I have run into a preface, while I professed to write a dedication.
It was he who had given Lady Jane that copy of poor Briggs's early poems, which he remembered to have seen at Queen's Crawley, with a dedication from the poetess to his father's late wife; and he brought the volume with him to Brighton, reading it in the Southampton coach and marking it with his own pencil, before he presented it to the gentle Lady Jane.
Bazzard has been the subject of one of these dedications.
Rosa looked at him as if she would have liked him to be the recipient of a thousand dedications.