deep


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deep

(Down), adjective at the lowest point, below, below floor level, below ground level, below the floor, below the ground, beneath, under grade, under the ground, underground, underneath
Associated concepts: declaration against interest, declaraaion of a dividend, declaration of a trust, in deep trouble with the law, searching deep into the evidence of a case, self-serving declaration

deep

(Profound), adjective abstruse, astute, erudite, esoteric, intellectual, intellectually profound, penetrating, perceptive, philosophical, recondite, sagacious, sage, scholarly, thoughtful, wise
Associated concepts: deep constituted interpretation
See also: abstruse, broad, capacious, esoteric, extensive, incomprehensible, ingrained, intense, obscure, profound, recondite, sapient
References in classic literature ?
I do forgive you, Hester," replied the minister at length, with a deep utterance, out of an abyss of sadness, but no anger.
Like one who after a night of drunken revelry hies to his bed, still reeling, but with conscience yet pricking him, as the plungings of the Roman race-horse but so much the more strike his steel tags into him; as one who in that miserable plight still turns and turns in giddy anguish, praying God for annihilation until the fit be passed; and at last amid the whirl of woe he feels, a deep stupor steals over him, as over the man who bleeds to death, for conscience is the wound, and there's naught to staunch it; so, after sore wrestlings in his berth, Jonah's prodigy of ponderous misery drags him drowning down to sleep.
There was no response, for a moment, in that deep darkness and that graveyard hush.
The motion of a raft is the needful motion; it is gentle, and gliding, and smooth, and noiseless; it calms down all feverish activities, it soothes to sleep all nervous hurry and impatience; under its restful influence all the troubles and vexations and sorrows that harass the mind vanish away, and existence becomes a dream, a charm, a deep and tranquil ecstasy.
No, he fell in," said Godfrey, in a low but distinct voice, as if he felt some deep meaning in the fact.
Th' ascent is easie then; Th' event is fear'd; should we again provoke Our stronger, some worse way his wrath may find To our destruction: if there be in Hell Fear to be worse destroy'd: what can be worse Then to dwell here, driv'n out from bliss, condemn'd In this abhorred deep to utter woe; Where pain of unextinguishable fire Must exercise us without hope of end The Vassals of his anger, when the Scourge Inexorably, and the torturing houre Calls us to Penance?
This smoke (or flame, perhaps, would be the better word for it) was so bright that the deep blue sky overhead and the hazy stretches of brown common towards Chertsey, set with black pine trees, seemed to darken abruptly as these puffs arose, and to remain the darker after their dispersal.
But the master gave his fellow countrymen an ethical system based upon sound common sense, and a deep knowledge of their customs and characteristics.
As Danglars approached the disappointed lover, he cast on him a look of deep meaning, while Fernand, as he slowly paced behind the happy pair, who seemed, in their own unmixed content, to have entirely forgotten that such a being as himself existed, was pale and abstracted; occasionally, however, a deep flush would overspread his countenance, and a nervous contraction distort his features, while, with an agitated and restless gaze, he would glance in the direction of Marseilles, like one who either anticipated or foresaw some great and important event.
One win- dow, glowing a deep murder red, shone squarely through the leaves.
They were on their way homeward, but had been obliged to swerve from their ordinary route through the mountains, by deep snows.
And it was all very nice - the large, sunny room; his deep, easy-chair in a bow window, with pillows and a footstool; the quiet, watchful care of the elderly, gentle woman who had borne him five children, and had not, perhaps, lived with him more than five full years out of the thirty or so of their married life.