fawn

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References in classic literature ?
The time has been when I have shot thirteen deer without counting the fa’ns standing in the door of my own hut; and for bear’s meat, if one wanted a ham or so, he had only to watch a-nights, and he could shoot one by moonlight, through the cracks of the logs, no fear of his oversleeping himself neither, for the howling of the wolves was sartin to keep his eyes open.
That I killed the deer,” answered the young man, with a little haughtiness, as he leaned on another long rifle similar to that of Natty.
We are under one Law, indeed," said Bagheera, wading into the water and looking across at the lines of clicking horns and starting eyes where the deer and the pig pushed each other to and fro.
The quick-spread ears of the deer caught the last sentence, and a frightened whisper ran along the ranks.
Some had shot deer in hungry wintertime, when they could get no other food, and had been seen in the act by the foresters, but had escaped, thus saving their ears; some had been turned out of their inheritance, that their farms might be added to the King's lands in Sherwood Forest; some had been despoiled by a great baron or a rich abbot or a powerful esquire-- all, for one cause or another, had come to Sherwood to escape wrong and oppression.
The roar that was intended to paralyze the deer broke horribly from the deep throat of the great cat--an angry roar of rage against the meddling Sheeta who had robbed him of his kill, and the charge that was intended for Bara was launched against the panther; but here too Numa was doomed to disappointment, for with the first notes of his fearsome roar Sheeta, considering well the better part of valor, leaped into a near-by tree.
The lion was roaring in rage close behind him as he swung the deer across his shoulder, and, grasping a foreleg between his strong teeth, leaped for the nearest of the lower branches that swung above his head.
We gathered up what was left of the red deer after skinning and cleaning it, and set out upon our return journey toward the U-boat.
Taylor and Delcarte picked up the slain deer, and we all started down toward the launch, walking slowly.
This deer is exceedingly abundant, often in small herds, throughout the countries bordering the Plata and in Northern Patagonia.
In the evening, replete with deer meat, resting on his elbow and smoking his after-supper cigarette, he said:
This was the spot where I struck the tracks of the buck; it was after I took the deer, that I fell upon the Teton trail.