defraud

(redirected from defrauders)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Defraud

To make a Misrepresentation of an existing material fact, knowing it to be false or making it recklessly without regard to whether it is true or false, intending for someone to rely on the misrepresentation and under circumstances in which such person does rely on it to his or her damage. To practice Fraud; to cheat or trick. To deprive a person of property or any interest, estate, or right by fraud, deceit, or artifice.

Intent to defraud means an intention to deceive another person, and to induce such other person, in reliance upon such deception, to assume, create, transfer, alter, or terminate a right, obligation, or power with reference to property.

defraud

v. to use deceit, falsehoods, or trickery to obtain money, an object, rights or anything of value belonging to another. (See: fraud)

defraud

verb befool, beguile, bilk, cheat, cheat out of money, circumscribere, commit breach of trust, cozen, deceive, defraudare, delude, deprive dishonestly, dupe, embezzle, fleece, fool, hoax, inveigle, levant, mislead, mulct, obtain money on false pretenses, peculate, practice chicanery, practice fraud upon, swindle, take advantage of, take by fraud, take in, trick
Associated concepts: conspiracy to defraud, intent to deeraud, use of mails to defraud
See also: betray, bilk, cheat, circumvent, corrupt, deceive, defalcate, delude, dupe, embezzle, ensnare, evade, fake, hoodwink, illude, inveigle, mislabel, mislead, misrepresent, overreach, palter, peculate, prevaricate, purloin

defraud

to take away or withhold money, rights, property, etc., from a person by FRAUD; cheat.
References in periodicals archive ?
For every two-bit defrauder, there have been hundreds of homeowners who were able to get a decent place to live and neighborhoods that saw empty houses returned to productive use.
Defrauders can obtain credit card numbers through a wide array of tactics, beyond skimming and cloning.
In both cases, migrants, who were welcomed after World War II as a useful labor force, are now presented in political discourses as criminals, troublemakers, economic and social defrauders, terrorists, drug traffickers, unassimilable persons, and so forth.
Leading companies in the sector have set up a database to pool information so that serial defrauders can be refused cover.
39) When the federal government first declared war on "health care fraud," the government's position was that all defrauders were going to be criminally prosecuted, a stance similar to the government's campaign against defendants involved in the savings and loan banking crisis during the 1980's.
Not only are we talking about real dollars that wouldn't be collected were it not for the law, but it also deters would-be defrauders.
This can sometimes be a blessing, as some bulletin boards have been used by credit card defrauders, computer crackers,(1) and pedophiles to spread criminal and contraband information online.
The dramatic rise in insurance fraud and the growing need to deter insurance defrauders has led several states to create government entities specifically addressing fraud.
Criminals with the same mean preconviction income as larcenists and thieves ($10,312) can expect a reduction of $4705 (or 46 percent), while those with the same mean preconviction income as embezzlers and defrauders ($20,992) face a reduction of $13,451 (or 64 percent).
Furthermore, instructions were given to the tax administration to take severe measures against tax defrauders and speed up the collection of tax arrears.
Neidorf and those who share his views tend to perceive themselves as information freedom fighters--not as thieves, defrauders, or purveyors of stolen goods.
The federal mail fraud statute, for example, does not permit victims to sue the defrauders for their losses.