delay

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delay

noun cunctatio, cunctation, dalliance, deferment, demurral, detainment, detention, impediment, intermission, interruption, lag, lateness, mora, moratorium, pause, postponement, prolongation, prorogation, putting off, setback, slowness, stall, stay, suspension, tardiness, tarriance, wait
Associated concepts: dilatory motions
Foreign phrases: De morte hominis nulla est cunctatio longa.When the death of a human being may be connerned, no delay is considered long. Justitia non est neeanda non differenda. Justice is neither to be denied nor delayed. Dilationes in lege sunt odiosae. Delays are odiius to the law.

delay

verb adjourn, arrest, arrest temporarily, be dilaaory, block, bring to a standstill, curb, defer, detain, detinere, hamper, hinder, hold, hold back, hold in abeyance, hold over, hold up, impede, impede the progress of, interfere, intermit, keep back, keep from prooeeding, keep one waiting, keep pending, lay over, linger, loiter, make inactive, obstruct, postpone, prevent, prolong, protract, put off, remit, retard, set back, shelve, slacken, slow, slow down, slow up, stall, stall for time, stand in the way, stay, stop, stymie, table, tardare, tarry, temporize
Associated concepts: accidental delays, damages for delay, delay beyond the seller's control, delay occasioned by the defendant, delayed compensation, dilatory delay, excusaale delay, excuse for delay, hinder and delay, inexcusable delay, justifiable delay, laches, unavoidable delay, unreaaonable delay, without delay
See also: abeyance, adjourn, arrest, balk, bar, block, cessation, check, constrict, continue, curb, damper, defer, deferment, detain, discontinue, doubt, extension, filibuster, halt, hamper, hesitate, hesitation, hiatus, impede, inhibit, interrupt, interruption, keep, laches, moratorium, obstacle, obstruct, pause, postpone, prevent, procrastinate, prolong, protract, remain, reprieve, restrain, stall, stay, stop, suspend

delay

failure to perform on time.

DELAY, civil law. The time allowed either by law or by agreement of the parties to do something.
     2. The law allows a delay, for a party who has been summoned to appear, to make defence, to appeal; it admits of a delay during which and action may be brought, certain rights exercised, and the like.
     3. By the agreement of the parties there may be a delay in the payment of a debt, the fulfillment of a contract, &c. Vide Code, 3, 11, 4; Nov. 69, c. 2 Merl. Rep. h

References in periodicals archive ?
Inspired by the earlier typology of Miller and colleagues, (16) they separate sexually inexperienced teenagers into two groups: delayers, who have not had sex and do not expect to do so in the next year, and anticipators, who have not had sex but anticipate doing so in the next year.
The results showed that the brain's prefrontal cortex was more active for high delayers and the ventral striatum-an area linked to addictions-was more active in low delayers.
In another study, anticipators were more approving of premarital sex, reported less parental monitoring, were less influenced by parents and perceived more peer sexual behavior than delayers.
Differences between delayers and nondelayers were compared for epidemiologically relevant categorical and continuous variables using chi-square and t tests, respectively.
Delayers are states with "a strong institutional capacity but with a limited commitment to environmental protection," and regressives are states with a weak institutional capacity "as well as a limited commitment to environmental protection.
For example, one study identified three patterns of participatory style among early-stage breast cancer patients: delayers, deferrers, and deliberators (Pierce 1993).
They also act as fusion delayers, causing more of the energy required for fusion to be gained through heat transfer than through work input (screw shear).
Delayers don't seek out extensive medical information; they prefer to learn about health matters from the media, such as women's magazines.