demeaning


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Demeaning is an expressive action that, like humiliation, is
are antiquated, demeaning and disrespectful" and asks "What do readers think?
Coming from such a milieu, an "award" would have been demeaning and an insult to Mel Gibson, to James Caviezel, and particularly to Jesus Christ.
Be firm and forceful, but not hostile or demeaning.
But it isn't the monarchy being demeaned here, the Queen is demeaning herself by being so petty.
I am not demeaning cheerleading skills," says Lopiano, "but is it a bona fide athletic opportunity for women or a convenient one for the athletic department?
What a terrible thing that we've been conditioned to immediately respond to certain people's accents as demeaning or embarrassing.
Allan Ulrich, editor of Dance Matters, responds: No amount of talent can or will excuse behavior that is unprofessional or demeaning to colleagues, even in the tightly knit ballet world.
It is demeaning to our black citizens and it demeans our society.
I find it appalling and believe it to be a disgrace and quite discouraging to see a black man displayed in such a demeaning manner.
Whipping Woman, 1964, illustrates an aggressively demeaning view of woman as mindless body--all bloated belly and breasts, topped by a tiny head.
He eschews layoffs and refuses to call his associates "employees" because he considers the term demeaning.