Tree

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TREE. A woody plant, which in respect of thickness and height grows greater than any other plant.
     2. Trees are part of the real estate while growing, and before they are severed from the freehold; but as soon as they are cut down, they are personal property.
     3. Some trees are timber trees, while others do not bear that denomination. Vide Timber, and 2 Bl. Com. 281.
     4. Trees belong to the owner of the land where they grow, but if the roots go out of one man's land into that of another, or the branches spread over the adjoining estates, such roots or branches may be cut off by the owner of the land into which they thus grow. Rolle's R. 394; 3 Bulst. 198; Vin. Ab. Trees, E; and tit. Nuisance, W 2, pl. 3; 8 Com. Dig. 983; 2 Com. Dig. 274; 10 Vin. Ab. 142; 20 Viii. Ab. 415; 22 Vin. Ab. 583; 1 Supp. to Ves. jr. 138; 2 Supp. to Ves. jr. 162, 448; 6 Ves. 109.
     5. When the roots grow into the adjoining land, the owner of such land may lawfully claim a right to hold the tree in common with the owner of the land where it was planted; but if the branches only overshadow the adjoining land, and the root does not enter it, the tree wholly belongs owner of the estate where the roots grow. 1 Swift's Dig. 104; 1 Hill. Ab. 6; 1 Ld. Raym. 737. Vide 13 Pick. R. 44; 1 Pick., R. 224; 4 Mass. R. 266; 6 N. H. Rep. 430; 3 Day, 476; 11 Co. 50; Rob. 316; 2 Rolle, It. 141 Moo. & Mal. 112; 11 Conn. R. 177; 7 Conn. 125; 8 East, R. 394; 5 B. & Ald. 600; 1 Chit. Gen. Pr. 625; 2 Phil. Ev. 138; Gale & Wheat. on Easem. 210; Code Civ. art. 671; Pardes. Tr. des Servitudes, 297; Bro. Ab. Demand, 20; Dall. Dict. mot Servitudes, art. 3 Sec. 8; 2 P. Wms. 606; Moor, 812; Hob. 219; Plowd. 470; 5 B. & C. 897; S. C. 8 D. & R. 651. When the tree grows directly on the boundary line, so that the line passes through it, it is the property of both owners, whether it be marked as a boundary or not. 12 N. H. Rep. 454.

References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of vitamin B-6 deficiency on morphological changes in dendritic trees of Purkinje cells in developing cerebellum of rats.
Study inclusion criteria included a) location in the cerebellum vermis; b) planar dendritic arbor largely parallel to the focal plane for maximum area assessment; c) fully stained dendritic arbors unobscured by cells or precipitate, and d) an intact dendritic tree with no cut dendritic segments.
Because the cultured hippocampal neurons reconstructed in this study lack dendritic lamination and not much is known regarding the distribution of conductances in these cells, a parsimonious and controlled strategy in the present study was to take the average of the four different sets of dendritic tree conductances from our previous work.
Indeed, one view of the dendritic tree is that it provides a structure to segregate different inputs to different dendritic limbs [22], the size and complexity of neuronal branching in a parasympathetic neuron, for example, increasing with the body size of a particular species [23, 24] and with the number of inputs on the neuron [25].
The group analyses the molecular regulation of neuronal dendritic tree formation during early development of the mouse neocortex.