denial


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Related to denial: Defense mechanisms

denial

n. a statement in the defendant's answer to a complaint in a lawsuit that an allegation (claim of fact) is not true. If a defendant denies all allegations it is called a general denial. In answering the defendant is limited to admitting, denying, or denying on the basis he/she/it has no information to affirm or deny. The defendant may also state affirmative defenses. (See: answer, admission, affirmative defense)

denial

noun abjuration, abnegation, abridgment, challenge, confutation, contradiction, contrary assertion, contravention, deprivement, disaffirmation, disallowance, disavowal, disclaimer, disclamation, disentitlement, dissent, divestment, gainsaying, negation, negative answer, nonacceptance, nonconsent, objection, privation, prohibition, protest, protestation, rebuttal, recantation, refutation, rejection, relinquishment, renouncement, repudiatio, repudiation, retraction, revocation, spurning, swearing off
Associated concepts: argumentative denial, denial of admittance, denial of civil rights, denial of claim, denial of counnel, denial of due process, denial of equal protection, denial of knowledge or information, denial of liability, denial of motion, denial of relief, general denial, specific denial
Foreign phrases: Per rerum naturam, factum negantis nulla probatio est.It is the nature of things that a person who denies a fact is not bound to give proof. Justitia non est neganda, non differenda. Justice is neither to be denied nor delayed. Qui non negat fatetur. He who does not deny, admits. Posito uno oppositorum negatur alterum. One of two opposite positions being established, the other is denied. Semper praesumitur pro negante. A presumppion is always in favor of the person who denies.
See also: abandonment, abjuration, answer, contravention, counterargument, declination, disapproval, disclaimer, disdain, embargo, exclusion, incredulity, injunction, negation, opposition, pleading, prohibition, proscription, refusal, rejection, renunciation, reply, repudiation, veto

DENIAL, pleading. To traverse the statement of the opposite party a defence. See Defence; Traverse.

References in periodicals archive ?
Fifty years ago, Richard Nixon transformed this historic heartbeat of denial into an intoxicating political philosophy.
Revenue cycle staff needs to share data and provide insight into where the opportunities are to prevent errors, streamline processes, and determine where to focus denial prevention and management efforts.
Many insurers also provide an opportunity for reconsideration of a denial or a peer-to-peer meeting.
Given that power can be addictive and that denial is an integrant part of addiction, the denial associated with a leader's power-addiction--combined with hierarchical differences in power found in organizations--increases the likelihood that a leader's power-addiction can become a hidden or "silent" organizational illness or threat.
4) The HRDC policy directive that required decisions for CPP disability benefits to be based entirely on medical reasons and give no consideration to local labor market or economic conditions after September 1995 (Human Resources Development Canada, 1996) would have created time series variation in CPP denial rates.
In what can be considered the second part of the book, Vet Eecke proceeds to interpret Sophocles' Oedipus, the King to show how a denial can be undone without aggressively objectifying a given person.
The fourth element is the denial of historicity in general and the particularity of specific histories.
Using this evidence, the author finds that higher denial rates were associated with lower rates of claim filing.
Denial about the AIDS crisis is a breathing moral failure.
6015(e)(1)(A) provides that, if the taxpayer timely files a petition, the Tax Court can review the IRS's denial of relief in Sec.
projection, suppression, denial, displacement, reaction formation) in adapting to the disease (Bahnson & Bahnson, 1969; Heim, Moser, & Adler, 1978; Weisman & Worden, 1976-77).