deport

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A second reason to distinguish between deportable and excludable aliens is that there is a difference between preventing someone from acquiring a government benefit to which he has no right and depriving him of it once he has acquired it.
Another provision of IIRAIRA is aggravated felony, which reclassifies past crimes of noncitizens to more serious and deportable offenses, even if they have already served their time for the infractions, have been rehabilitated, or never spent a day in jail.
Historian Cindy Hahamovitch's examination of guestworker programs in the United States, No Man's Land: Jamaican Guestworkers in America and the Global History of Deportable Labor, offers a thoroughly researched critique of a labour supply system "in which the world's wealthy nations import foreigners to do their hardest, dirtiest, and often their most intimate work.
The new medical residency laws also added Hepatitis B to the deportable diseases list, which already includes HIV/AIDS and turberculosis.
Structure addresses the statutes defining deportable noncitizens.
The legislation, still being worked on, includes measures to track Social Security numbers; a bill making it a felony for deportable illegal immigrants to fail to attend removal proceedings; and one taking aim at so-called ``anchor babies'' by requiring that at least one parent be a citizen or legal resident before a child born in the U.
According to the official government position, the act's framers intended for it to "establish measures to control the borders of the United States, protect legal workers through worksite enforcement, and remove criminal and other deportable aliens" (U.
Rehnquist said that Congress was "justifiably concerned that deportable criminal aliens fail to appear for their removal hearings in large numbers.
21) As an immigrant during this time period, Yamataya was considered deportable because "she was a pauper and a person likely to become a public charge.
And just to give a little specificity to this, the PATRIOT Act makes immigrants deportable for wholly innocent associations.
In addition to the 9/11 detainees, the ranks of INS detainees include thousands of undocumented immigrants held for deportation, asylum seekers whose petitions weren't granted, and legal permanent residents with criminal convictions considered deportable offenses.