depreciate

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depreciate

v. in accounting, to reduce the value of an asset each year theoretically on the basis that the assets (such as equipment, vehicles or structures) will eventually become obsolete, worn out and of little value. (See: depreciation)

depreciate

verb atrophy, attenuate, become deteriirated, become of less worth, belittle, censure, cheapen, contemn, corrode, cut, debase, debilitate, decay, decline, decrease, decry, deduct, defame, deflate, degenerate, degrade, denigrate, denounce, depress, deride, derogate from, deteriorate, detract from, detrectare, devaluate, dilute, diminish the price of, diminish the value of, discount, discredit, disesteem, disgrace, disparage, drop, dwindle, ebb, enervate, enfeeble, erode, fall, fault, find fault with, get worse, grow less, grow worse, impoverish, lessen, lessen the price of, lose value, lower, lower in price, lower in reputation, lower in value, lower the value of, make little of, malign, minimize, misprize, obtrectare, readjust downward, reduce the purchasing value of, reduce the strength of, retrograde, run down, shrink, sink, slight, slur, soil, spoil, stain, sully, taint, take away, tarnish, traduce, underestimate, underpraise, underrate, underreckon, undervalue, weaken, wear, worsen
Associated concepts: depreciate a loss, obsolescence
See also: adulterate, blame, censure, condemn, contemn, criticize, debase, decay, decrease, decry, deduct, defame, demean, demote, denigrate, denounce, depress, derogate, deteriorate, dilute, diminish, disbelieve, discommend, discount, discredit, disparage, fault, humiliate, jeer, lessen, minimize, misprize, reduce, smear, spurn, sully, underestimate
References in classic literature ?
A second and more practical, but less systematic, form of this Socialism sought to depreciate every revolutionary movement in the eyes of the working class, by showing that no mere political reform, but only a change in the material conditions of existence, in economic relations, could be of any advantage to them.
Ah, depreciate other persons' dinners; you ministers give such splendid ones.
My dear," answered Penelope, "I have no wish to set myself up, nor to depreciate you; but I am not struck by your appearance, for I very well remember what kind of a man you were when you set sail from Ithaca.
To this Mary very gravely replied, "Far be it from me, my dear sister, to depreciate such pleasures
If only you could realize the absolute absurdity of any of you attempting to depreciate a person so immeasurably above you