depressed


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
References in classic literature ?
Jane's frame of mind was naturally depressed and timorous, having been affected by Miranda's gloomy presages of evil to come.
I wished I had kept my candle burning: the night was drearily dark; my spirits were depressed.
A half- civilised ferocity lurked yet in the depressed brows and eyes full of black fire, but it was subdued; and his manner was even dignified: quite divested of roughness, though stern for grace.
Depressed and slinking though they were, eyes of fire were not wanting among them; nor compressed lips, white with what they suppressed; nor foreheads knitted into the likeness of the gallows-rope they mused about enduring, or inflicting.
She hurried to the door, and met her husband; a man whose face was careworn and depressed, though he was young.
There was an air of toleration or depreciation about his utterance of these words, that rather depressed me; and I was still looking sideways at his block of a face in search of any encouraging note to the text, when he said here we were at Barnard's Inn.
A knight was now and then seen to cross the court in his long white cloak, his head depressed on his breast, and his arms folded.
Jansenius looked sternly and disappointedly at Agatha, who elevated her left eyebrow and depressed her right simultaneously; but he, shaking his head to signify that he was not to be conciliated by facial feats, however difficult or contrary to nature, went out with Miss Wilson, followed by Mrs.
This article made a great deal of noise, and, being copied into all the papers, seriously depressed the advocates of the rash tourist.
Yet somehow I feel depressed when I read it, for I seem now to have grown twice as old as I was when I penned its concluding lines.
It seems to me that in England they play a very faded-out part, and those with whom I conversed had a kind of depressed and humiliated tone; a little dull, tame look, as if they were used to being snubbed and bullied, which made me want to give them a good shaking.
I have noted it, in my History of King Henry the Seventh of England, who depressed bis nobility; whereupon it came to pass, that his times were full of difficulties and troubles; for the nobility, though they continued loyal unto him, yet did they not co-operate with him in his business.