deputy

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Deputy

A person duly authorized by an officer to serve as his or her substitute by performing some or all of the officer's functions.

A deputy sheriff is designated to act on behalf of the sheriff in regard to official business.

A general deputy or undersheriff, pursuant to an appointment, has authority to execute all of the regular duties of the office of sheriff and serves process without any special authority from the sheriff.

A special deputy, who is an officer pro hac vice (Latin for "for this turn"), is appointed to render a special service. A special deputy acts under a specific, rather than a general, appointment and authority.

Cross-references

Service of Process.

deputy

noun agent, alternate, ambassador, appointee, assignee, broker, commissary, commissioner, emissary, envoy, factor, intermediary, minister, plenipotentiary, proctor, procurator, proxy, representative, second, secondary, substitute, surrogate, vicar, vicarius, vicegerent
Associated concepts: de facto deputy, deputy commissioner, deputy marshal, deputy officer, deputy sheriff, general deputy, special deputy
Foreign phrases: Vicarius non habet vicarium.A deputy cannot have a deputy.
See also: acting, assistant, broker, coadjutant, conduit, factor, intermediary, liaison, medium, plenipotentiary, proctor, procurator, proxy, replacement, representative, spokesman, substitute, surrogate

DEPUTY. One authorized by an officer to exercise the office or right which the officer possesses, for and in place of the latter.
     2. In general, ministerial officers can appoint deputies; Com. Dig. Officer, D 1; unless the office is to be exercised by the ministerial officer in person; and where the office partakes of a judicial and ministerial character, although a deputy may be made for the performance of ministerial acts, one cannot be made for the performance of a judicial act; a sheriff cannot therefore make a deputy to hold an inquisition, under a writ of inquiry, though he may appoint a deputy to serve a writ.,
     3. In general, a deputy has power to do every act which his principal might do but a deputy cannot make a deputy.
     4. A deputy should always act in the name of his principal. The principal is liable for the deputy's acts performed by him as such, and for the neglect of the deputy; Dane's Ab. vol. 3, c. 76, a. 2; and the deputy is liable himself to the person injured for his own tortious acts. Dane's Ab. Index, h.t.; Com. Dig. Officer, D; Viscount, B. Vide 7 Vin. Ab. 556 Arch. Civ. Pl. 68; 16 John. R. 108.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the absence of a PD (no Health Proxy) and when no Deputyship comprising medical affairs is in place, Swiss law draws up a list of individuals who are authorised to represent the patient who lacks the capacity to consent (Art.
Whilst health and social care professionals should take into account parents / carers views when making best interest decisions, they can sometimes disagree and unless there is a deputyship order in place, they will make the final decision.
For a review of the controversy regarding such claims of deputyship among the shi'a clergy as late as the seventeenth century, see Andrew J.
Let him strive for that which was customary of their sound circumstances (la-yatawkhkha ma ta'ud min istiqama sha'nihima), (69) and grant them an excellent position of deputyship to him (wa-la-yuwallihuma basan mawqi' al-niyaba 'anhu), and show them (wa-layabdu lahuma) (70) the cheek of good fortune by his grace (safhat al-iqbal bi-mannihi).
This particular lady has been suffering with dementia for some time and the family is trying to attain power of attorney or deputyship to ensure that the client's assets are protected.
Also, Deputy Premier Bulent Arinc said that dropping the deputyship of parliamentarians, who did not take oath at the Parliament, could not be on the agenda, and he expressed hope that the crisis would be solved within a few days.
The PLC, for example, is so far refusing to recognize Gómez Urcuyo's deputyship as legitimate.
She joins Jacksons' private client department specialising in wills and the administration of estates, including inheritance tax planning and trust work, as well as court of protection work such as lasting powers of attorney and deputyship applications.
Lydia joins the department specialising in wills and the administration of estates, including inheritance tax planning and trust work, as well as Court of Protection work such as Lasting Powers of Attorney and Deputyship applications.
The fear is that possible contenders to succeed Mr Blair may use the deputyship as a staging post for a tilt at the real thing.
These ambitions dovetailed with the ambitions deputyship of Thomas Wentworth (1632-1641).
Christ's life was a life of deputyship and the life of a Christian should be a life of deputyship.