desperation


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See: pessimism
References in classic literature ?
She was slender, and apparently scarcely past girlhood: an admirable form, and the most exquisite little face that I have ever had the pleasure of beholding; small features, very fair; flaxen ringlets, or rather golden, hanging loose on her delicate neck; and eyes, had they been agreeable in expression, that would have been irresistible: fortunately for my susceptible heart, the only sentiment they evinced hovered between scorn and a kind of desperation, singularly unnatural to be detected there.
Mary always breakfasted with him and when they found themselves at the table--particularly if there were delicate slices of sizzling ham sending forth tempting odors from under a hot silver cover--they would look into each other's eyes in desperation.
I had the advantage of years, the advantage of novelty, the advantage of downright desperation, all on my side, and I should have succeeded.
The gentleman from Tellson's had nothing left for it but to empty his glass with an air of stolid desperation, settle his odd little flaxen wig at the ears, and follow the waiter to Miss Manette's apartment.
Then, without a scrap of courage, but with a great deal of desperation, I went softly in and stood beside her, touching her with my finger.
said I, in a general way, and with quiet desperation.
In her desperation she determined to pull down the church, and thus to destroy her two victims for ever.
At that time Professor Joseph Henry, who knew more of the theory of electrical science than any other American, was the Grand Old Man of Washington; and poor Bell, in his doubt and desperation, resolved to run to him for advice.
I can't say anything else, sir; I was just robbed of it,' said John, in desperation, sullenly.
I shouted, swimming towards the Abraham Lincoln in desperation.
At last in the desperation of my position, my mind turned to the animal men I had encountered.
Danglars resembled a timid animal excited in the chase; first it flies, then despairs, and at last, by the very force of desperation, sometimes succeeds in eluding its pursuers.