despise

(redirected from despiser)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

despise

verb abhor, abominate, be hostile to, be inimmcal toward, bear malice toward, detest, disfavor, dislike, execrate, feel hostile toward, hate, have an aversion tooard, have animus toward, have aversion to, have connempt for, have ill will toward, loathe, resent
See also: contemn, decry, disdain, disfavor, dishonor, flout, misprize, rebuff, reject, renounce, spurn
References in periodicals archive ?
Fast forward to 2004 and we're back in The Land, where Avery faces a new battle with Lord Foul, the Despiser, not only to save the once beautiful world into which she is hurled but also to rescue her adopted autistic savant son.
When Leigh Hunt described the heir to the throne as "a libertine head over heels in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demi-reps" (i.
If sometimes the city requires a subsidy, shall we run to indigent day laborers or some despiser of wealth, or instead to the rich, that is, to the avaricious?
As Francis Espinasse, admirer of Carlyle and despiser of Panizzi, tartly remarked, 'the fat pedant and Italian language-master proved more than a match for the Scottish man of genius'.
or embittered novelist or some other cultured despiser of the academy--embraces this position, we are truly witnessing, to borrow a phrase from Ralph Ellison, "a union of April and December.
condemned him into exile, not as a despiser of religion but as a seditious person and a raiser up of dissension among the people.
Rushdie, excoriated as a despiser of the Koran and the religion of Islam, is shown to be a devout Muslim.
In fact, it is the religious skeptic, the cultured despiser, the "rationalist," (or the "denier" as James calls him) who is intellectually dishonest.
Without the comma, the translation would read `became a despiser of the god of Israel ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII])', instead of `became a despiser of the offspring of God, Israel'.
He's also tackled some overtly political topics as well as his more typical politics of the heart - one of hi s ambitions ns i s t o be rock's Milan Kundera (despite Kundera's being an energetic despiser of rock music and kitschy radicalism).
Thus that penetrating despiser of opinion and hater of the good, Iago, came out, in Bloom's reading, smelling more like a rose than frail Desdemona.
It is a book designed for the liberal churchgoer or cultured despiser of Christianity rather than for scholars or the pious, but Taylor does show that an interesting and critical line can be held without recourse to footnotes and references.