despise

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despise

verb abhor, abominate, be hostile to, be inimmcal toward, bear malice toward, detest, disfavor, dislike, execrate, feel hostile toward, hate, have an aversion tooard, have animus toward, have aversion to, have connempt for, have ill will toward, loathe, resent
See also: contemn, decry, disdain, disfavor, dishonor, flout, misprize, rebuff, reject, renounce, spurn
References in periodicals archive ?
and despiser of domestic ties," (40) found the prospect of a revenge opera representing the destruction of a high-born philanderer before an audience of enraptured city radicals too much to bear.
When Leigh Hunt described the heir to the throne as "a libertine head over heels in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demi-reps" (i.
Both suicides despise tyranny, but the revolutionary suicide is both a great despiser and a great adorer who longs for another shore.
A misogynist and racist, a despiser of everything he cannot understand and control, he spits out wondrously stylized rants whose fury and anger glow in a white heat of poetry and rhetorical brilliance.
But even Jeremy Clarkson, that well-known despiser of all things automotive and American, will champion the Ford Mustang as one of the finest of them all.
Fast forward to 2004 and we're back in The Land, where Avery faces a new battle with Lord Foul, the Despiser, not only to save the once beautiful world into which she is hurled but also to rescue her adopted autistic savant son.
If sometimes the city requires a subsidy, shall we run to indigent day laborers or some despiser of wealth, or instead to the rich, that is, to the avaricious?
As Francis Espinasse, admirer of Carlyle and despiser of Panizzi, tartly remarked, 'the fat pedant and Italian language-master proved more than a match for the Scottish man of genius'.
Rushdie, excoriated as a despiser of the Koran and the religion of Islam, is shown to be a devout Muslim.
In fact, it is the religious skeptic, the cultured despiser, the "rationalist," (or the "denier" as James calls him) who is intellectually dishonest.
Thus that penetrating despiser of opinion and hater of the good, Iago, came out, in Bloom's reading, smelling more like a rose than frail Desdemona.
One such despiser is Robinson himself, who sees Augustine and Luther as having altogether suppressed the corporality of human existence in general and of translation in particular; consequently, a persistent and most unfortunate anti-Christian polemic runs throughout Robinson's book.