(redirected from developmental disability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to developmental disability: developmental delay


The lack of competent physical and mental faculties; the absence of legal capability to perform an act.The term disability usually signifies an incapacity to exercise all the legal rights ordinarily possessed by an average person. Convicts, minors, and incompetents are regarded to be under a disability. The term is also used in a more restricted sense when it indicates a hindrance to marriage or a deficiency in legal qualifications to hold office.

The impairment of earning capacity; the loss of physical function resulting in diminished efficiency; the inability to work.

In the context of Workers' Compensation statutes, disability consists of an actual incapacity to perform tasks within the course of employment, with resulting wage loss, in addition to physical impairment that might, or might not, be incapacitating.

Under federal law, the definition of a disability, for Social Security benefits purposes, requires the existence of a medically ascertainable physical or mental impairment that can be expected to result in death or endures for a stated period, and an inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity due to the impairment.


n. 1) a condition which prevents one from performing all usual physical or mental functions. This usually means a permanent state, like blindness, but in some cases is temporary. In recent times society and the law have dictated that people with disabilities should be accommodated and encouraged to operate to their maximum potential and have the right to participate in societal and governmental activity without impediments. Hence, access by ramps, elevators, special parking places and other special arrangements have become required in many statutes. 2) a legal impediment, including being a minor who cannot make a contract, or being insane or incompetent, as determined by others.


(Legal disqualification), noun disablement, impairment, invalidation, invalidity, legal incapacity, unqualification, unqualifiedness, unsuitability, unsuitedness, want of legal capacity, want of legal qualification
Foreign phrases: Contra non valentem agere nulla currit praescriptio.No prescription runs against a person who is unable to act.


(Physical inability), noun affliction, ailment, debilitation, debility, deterioration, disablement, disorder, disqualification, feebleness, frailty, handicap, helplessness, illness, impairment, impotence, impotency, inability, inabillty to work, inadequacy, incapability, incapacitation, incompetence, incompetency, indisposition, ineffectiveness, ineffectuality, ineffectualness, inefficacy, inefficiency, infirmity, insufficiency, malady, powerlessness, sickness, unfitness, unsoundness, weakness
Associated concepts: complete disability, continuous disabillty, disability benefits, disability compensation, disability innurance, general disability, medical disability, mental dissbility, partial disability, physical disability, proof of disability, temporary disability, total disability
See also: detriment, disadvantage, disease, disorder, disqualification, handicap, impediment, impuissance, inability, incapacity, inefficacy, pain

DISABILITY. The want of legal capacity to do a thing.
     2. Persons may be under disability, 1. To make contracts. 2. To bring actions.
     3.-1. Those who want understanding; as idiots, lunatics, drunkards, and infants or freedom to exercise their will, as married women, and persons in duress; or who, in consequence of their situation, are forbidden by the policy of the law to enter into contracts, as trustees, executors, administrators, or guardians, are under disabilities to make contracts. See Parties; Contracts.
    4.-2. The disabilities to sue are, 1. Alienage, when the alien is an enemy. Bac. Ab. Abatement, B 3; Id. Alien, E: Com. Dig. Abatement , K; Co. Litt. 129. 2. Coverture; unless as co-plaintiff with her husband, a married woman cannot sue. 3. Infancy; unless he appears by guardian or prochein ami. Co. Litt. 135, b; 2 Saund. 117, f, n. 1 Bac. Ab. Infancy, K 2 Conn. 357; 7 John. 373; Gould, Pl. c. 5, Sec. 54. 4. That no such person as that named has any existence, is not, or never was, in rerum natura. Com. Dig. Abatement, E 16, 17; 1 Chit. Pl. 435; Gould on Pl. c. 5, Sec. 58; Lawes' Pl. 104; 19 John. 308. By the law of England there are other disabilities; these are, 1. Outlawry. 2. Attainder. 3. Praemunire. 4. Popish recusancy. 5. Monachism.
    5. In the acts of limitation it is provided that persons lying under certain disabilities, such as being non compos, an infant, in prison, or under coverture, shall have the right to bring actions after the disability shall have been removed.
    6. In the construction of this saving in the acts, it has been decided that two disabilities shall not be joined when they occur in different persons; as, if a right of entry accrue to a feme covert, and during the coverture she die, and the right descends to her infant son. But the rule is otherwise when there are several disabilities in the same person; as, if the right accrues to an infant, and before he has attained his full age, he becomes non compos mentis; in this case he may establish his right after the removal of the last disability. 2 Prest. Abs. of Tit. 341 Shep. To. 31; 3 Tho. Co. Litt. pl. 18, note L; 2 H. Bl. 584; 5 Whart. R. 377. Vide Incapacity.

References in periodicals archive ?
All qualifying mental health, developmental disability, and substance use disorder providers will be afforded equal opportunities to apply for this grant.
Participants highlighted important concerns about the prevalence of developmental disabilities in CPS, understanding of what constitutes a developmental disability, the impact of developmental disability on screening and assessment, and perceived supports to improve the system's ability to identify and assess the needs of children with developmental disabilities and their families.
Six of the largest developmental disability service providers in Sedgwick County were included in this case study.
In the field of developmental disability, the thrust of social policy is toward "closing institutions and establishing community-based facilities" (Braddock, Fijiura, Hemp, Mitchell, & Bachelder, 1991, p.
Making a Difference is an important document that addresses some unclear issues around the neglect and abuse of people who live with developmental disability.
I felt the services we were providing leaned more toward "babysitting" than toward the interactive care program we're used to on the developmental disability side.
Ray is one of a growing number of people with a developmental disability such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy or autism, whose family can no longer provide care because of age, infirmity or death.
The final chapter considers wider issues of psychosocial intervention and life planning for the ageing individual with developmental disability.
As a result of the State's failure to make payments, developmental disability service providers were at risk of closing, and thousands of people with developmental disabilities were in danger of losing their homes and being forced to move into unfamiliar and inappropriate settings.
The Department of Aging and Independent Living (DAIL) Developmental Disabilities Services and Adult Services Divisions (DDSD and ASD) are seeking an organization or consultant to perform housing accessibility and safety inspections of 24 hour residential support homes and developmental disability services agency community support sites funded by the Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD) and Aging Services Division (ASD).
The groundbreaking ceremony will commemorate the addition of a new 10,000 square foot facility designed to meet the needs of individuals experiencing a decrease in independent living skills due to aging and/or characteristics of their developmental disability.
Drawing on 30 years of experience in vocational services for persons with developmental disabilities, Wiegan discusses the value of meaningful employment for both the person with developmental disability and for society as a whole, and offers a step-by-step system for developing a successful jobs program for persons with developmental disabilities, based on a business model rather than the traditional social services model.

Full browser ?