deviating from the norm

deviating from the norm

verb alter one's course, depart from a norm, digress, diverge, drift, go astray, maunder, meander, skew, slew, straggle, stray, swerve, take a different course, wander
See also: irregular
References in periodicals archive ?
In a similar vein of deviating from the norm, a study from researchers at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan found that people who stay up late are more likely to find alternative solutions to a problem compared to their early-morning risers.
Contract notice: Manufacture and supply of a fire engine stlf season 20/25 after trh stlf20 / 25: 2007 and din 1846, however, deviating from the norm with water tank about 4 000 liters including firefighters technical loading.
This space is usually reserved for comment on the weird but rarely wonderful ways of Scotland's national sport but no apologies are offered for deviating from the norm.
Because itOs such a tremendous value this summer, most international travelers are deviating from the norm and heading to Western Europe, which has managed to take share from the Caribbean.
She needs an opportunity to understand what the problem is and how she is deviating from the norm, as well as being able to review specific cases.
However, a well-trained claims handler with a manageable caseload would also be able to determine that a claimant may be deviating from the norm when it comes to treatment.
The state gathers such information not to rank hospitals but to identify outliers, or programs deviating from the norm, that need attention.
We are deviating from the norm by doing textiles for both home and fashion," Marwah said.
He knows what the reader expects and delights in deviating from the norm.
If a medical condition or accident requires deviating from the norm, that exception must be documented in the remarks section for reviewers to consider.
IT'S usual practice for a reviewer to concentrate on the headline act, but on this occasion I am deviating from the norm.
In a classic essay that bears the same title as Cohen's book, Halpern concluded that American life is "capable of making the Jewishness of Jews salient, or even central, in their lives, and in such cases American Zionism expresses itself in forms sharply deviating from the norm of the semi-involved [American Jewish] consensus.