devolution

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devolution

n. the transfer of rights, powers, or an office (public or private) from one person or government to another. (See: devolve)

devolution

noun assignment, bequeathal, bequest, change of hands, conveyance, delegation, delegation of duties, deliverance, delivery, demise, devise, interchange, nonretention, reversion, substitution, succession, succession of property rights, transfer, transfer of property, transference, transmission
Associated concepts: devolution of liability, devolution of property
See also: assignment, conveyance, delegation, deputation, succession

devolution

1 the transmission ofan interest in property from one person to another by operation of law.
2 in constitutional law, the giving of a degree of power, functional, sectional or geographic, to an inferior body. A recent legal model appeared in the Scotland Act 1998.

DEVOLUTION, eccl. law. The transfer, by forfeiture, of a right and power which a person has to another, on account of some act or negligence of the person who is vested with such right or power: for example, when a person has the right of preseptation, and he does not present within the time prescribed, the right devolves on his next immediate superior. Ayl. Par. 331.

References in periodicals archive ?
The truly dedicated devolutionist should focus on making sure local governments deserve more authority.
In both Scotland and Wales it is hopelessly split between unionists on the one hand and devolutionists on the other.
Privately, however, devolutionists are relieved as they had braced themselves for an outright recommendation to vote `no'.
Public services don't make money, they cost money, and Wales has one of the highest proportions of employees working in the public sector in the UK - how do the devolutionists think we are going to fund these services?
No amount of nation-building is going to alter that, whatever ardent devolutionists might wish.
The National Assembly does not currently have the power to make or change laws produced by Westminster - something which devolutionists say is crucial to the development of a separate Wales.
It has been a propaganda war on behalf of the devolutionists.
Some are listed as Think Twice supporters, and others are listed as anti- devolutionists described as "known no-no's".
In the event, it wasn't the half-hearted, hesitant shuffle the Tory anti- Devolutionists predicted.
Thatcher has even told anti- devolutionists public support from her would be "unhelpful".