suffer

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Suffer

To admit, allow, or permit.

The term suffer is used to convey the idea of Acquiescence, passivity, indifference, or abstention from preventive action, as opposed to the taking of an affirmative step.

suffer

verb abide, accede, accept, allow, assent, authorize, be reconciled, be resigned, bear with, brook, comply, concede, consent, empower, give consent, give leave, give permission, grant, grant perrission, indulge, let, license, oblige, pati, permittere, put up with, sinere, tolerate

suffer

(Sustain loss), verb agonize, ail, anguish, be afflicted, be impaired, be injured, be racked, be stricken, be subjected to, be wounded, bear, endure, experience loss, feel pain, hurt, incur loss, languish, lose, minui, sacrifice, sustain damage
Associated concepts: suffer harm, suffer loss
See also: abide, acknowledge, allow, bear, consent, endure, forbear, languish, let, permit, recognize, sanction, tolerate, vouchsafe
References in periodicals archive ?
They didn't suffer fools gladly but they were always nice and polite to everyone they met.
He didn't suffer fools gladly because he was a very principled man, sometimes to his own detriment, but he was one of those lucky people whose job was also his hobby.
Of his brother's commitment to his work Mr Humphrys said: "It was the enthusiasm he had that made him a great journalist and he didn't suffer fools gladly as the WRU found out in its dark days.
A man who didn't suffer fools gladly - and that included his own team-mates.
A source said: "She admitted from the start that she didn't suffer fools gladly - and she didn't.
Martin didn't suffer fools gladly and was a 'point the finger and go straight through you' kind of guy.
He didn't suffer fools gladly, but he would never ask you to do anything he wouldn't have done himself.
He was a disciplinarian, showed tremendous attention to detail, didn't suffer fools gladly, which is the sign of a true professional," says Hales, who became a close friend as well as a client of Richards.
He was a gentleman, but he didn't suffer fools gladly.
He was a comedian who didn't suffer fools gladly - and it became an integral part of his act.

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