digestion


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Related to digestion: Chemical digestion
See: osmosis
References in classic literature ?
Casaubon; digestion was made difficult by the interference of citations, or by the rivalry of dialectical phrases ringing against each other in his brain.
I had to wait until the processes of digestion had re-leased my escort from its torpor.
Moreover, she is one of those delightful, old-fashioned cooks who don't care a bit if they ruin your digestion as long as they can give you feasts of fat things.
To dine at half-past seven," the Duchess remarked, as she looked around the ENTRESOL of the great restaurant through her lorgnettes, "is certainly a little trying for one's temper and for one's digestion, but so long as those men accepted, I certainly think they ought to have been here.
You were living like a savage when I came along and found you--eating nothing but tinned meat and scones that would have ruined the digestion of a camel.
He ate whatever he liked, and all he wanted, avoiding only such combinations that experience had taught him disagreed with his digestion.
In a deep leather chair, his feet resting in another deep leather chair, at the Indoor Yacht Club, Harry Del Mar yielded to the somniferous digestion of lunch, which was for him breakfast as well, and glanced through the first of the early editions of the afternoon papers.
An excellent omelette, and cutlets cooked to perfection, he sent away untasted--he, whose appetite never failed him, whose digestion was still equal to any demands on it!
It is what comes when there is nothing wrong with one's digestion, when his stomach is in trim and his appetite has an edge, and all goes well.
Having finished the paper, a second cup of coffee and a roll and butter, he got up, shaking the crumbs of the roll off his waistcoat; and, squaring his broad chest, he smiled joyously: not because there was anything particularly agreeable in his mind--the joyous smile was evoked by a good digestion.
Billy said, when he had driven on out of hearing; "that's too rich for our digestion.
They are generally those dyspeptic ladies and gentlemen who eat unheard-of quantities of hot corn bread (almost as good for the digestion as a kneaded pin-cushion), for breakfast, and for supper.