digress

(redirected from digressions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to digressions: discretions

digress

verb aberrare, alter course, be diffuse, branch out, change direction, depart, detour, deviate, divaricate, diverge, divert, drift, expatiate, fly off at a tangent, go astray, meander, ramble, rove, shift, sidestep, sidetrack, skirt, stray, swerve, turn, veer, wander
See also: depart, detour, deviate, differ, vary
References in classic literature ?
I think that the digression of my thoughts must have done me good, for when I got back to bed I found a lethargy creeping over me.
After this digression, we shall return to our narrative.
Inquiries and communications concerning brothers and sisters, the situation of some, the growth of the rest, and other family matters now passed between them, and continued, with only one small digression on James's part, in praise of Miss Thorpe, till they reached Pulteney Street, where he was welcomed with great kindness by Mr.
But, to return from this digression, care ought to be taken that the bodies of the children may be such as will answer the expectations of the legislator; this also will be affected by the same means.
I suppose it was a very pretty example of the triumph of spirit over matter, and so my digression has at least the advantage of a moral.
For the sake of a digression, he took up a check book from the table.
Forgive, I pray you, this inconsequent digression by what was once a woman.
And while on this digression, let me repeat the question I have repeated to myself ten thousand times.
Nestor in a digression tells him how Epopeus was utterly destroyed after seducing the daughter of Lycus, and the story of Oedipus, the madness of Heracles, and the story of Theseus and Ariadne.
The young lady then, by an easy digression, led the discourse to her own wardrobe, and after recounting its principal beauties at some length, took her friend upstairs to make inspection thereof.
It is true that in his early, imitative, work he shares the medieval faults of wordiness, digression, and abstract symbolism; and, like most medieval writers, he chose rather to reshape material from the great contemporary store than to invent stories of his own.
The gallant behaviour of Jones, and the more dreadful consequence of that behaviour to the young lady; with a short digression in favour of the female sex.