References in classic literature ?
Everything which had been disconnected before began at once to assume its true place, and I had a shadowy presentiment of the whole sequence of events.
The engineer had disconnected the feed-pipes to clean out the rust.
I disconnected it," he said, "and just in the nick of time.
This literary form--a collection of disconnected stories bound together in a fictitious framework--goes back almost to the beginning of literature itself; but Chaucer may well have been directly influenced by Boccaccio's famous book of prose tales, 'The Decameron' (Ten Days of Story-Telling).
You understand I am piecing here bits of disconnected statements.
The consequence was, that after a flying transit through part of France and part of Italy, I came back nearly as ignorant as I went, having made no acquaintance with persons and manners, and very little with things, my head swarming with a motley confusion of objects and scenes; some, it is true, leaving a deeper and more pleasing impression than others, but these embittered by the recollection that my emotions had not been shared by my companion, but that, on the contrary, when I had expressed a particular interest in anything that I saw or desired to see, it had been displeasing to him, inasmuch as it proved that I could take delight in anything disconnected with himself.
He disliked contradiction, and still more, arguments that were continually skipping from one thing to another, introducing new and disconnected points, so that there was no knowing to which to reply.
On this, the disconnected words, and fragments of sentences, which had dropped from Mr.
It appeared to us a land without memories, regrets, and hopes; a land where nothing could survive the coming of the night, and where each sunrise, like a dazzling act of special creation, was disconnected from the eve and the morrow.
And on this characteristic reasoning, having all the force of insane logic, Mrs Verloc's disconnected wits went to work practically.
it cried -- small, lonely and unmoved, a stranger to the visions of hope or fear; and it flickered into disconnected words: "Ship.
Miss Miggs's sense of hearing, however, having as sharp an edge as her temper, and being of the same snappish and suspicious kind, very soon informed her that the footsteps passed her door, and appeared to have some object quite separate and disconnected from herself.