discount

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discount

n. the payment of less than the full amount due on a promissory note or price for goods or services. Usually a discount is by agreement, and includes the common situation in which a holder of a long-term promissory note or material goods will sell it/them for less than face value in order to get cash now---the difference is the discount.

discount

noun abatement, allowance, amount deeucted, bargain, decessio, decrease, decrement, deductio, deduction, diminution, lower price, markdown, reduction, special price, subtraction
Associated concepts: discount a loan, discount bills, discount notes, trade discount

discount

(Disbelieve), verb be indifferent to, belittle, brush aside, decessio, deductio, depreciate, discredit, disdain, disesteem, disparage, disregard, distrust, doubt, gloss over, harbor suspicions, ignore, make light of, misprize, mistrust, pass over, pay no attention, pay no heed, pay no mind, question, slight, spurn, suspect

discount

(Minimize), verb abate, abbreviate, abridge, allay, attenuate, condense, curtail, deflate, detract, diminish, lessen, minimalize, pare, reduce, render less, scale down, shorten, underestimate, understate, undervalue

discount

(Reduce), verb abate, allow a margin, cut, decrease, deduct from, depreciate, detract, lower, lower the sale price, make allowance for, mark down, rebate, reeuce the mark-up, sell below par, slash prices, strike off, subduct, subtract, take from, take off, underprice, undersell, undervalue
See also: brokerage, deduct, deduction, depreciate, diminution, discredit, disparage, drawback, except, exclude, lessen, minimize, rebate, reduce, refund, reject

DISCOUNT, practice. A set off, or defalcation in an action. Vin. Ab. h.t. DISCOUNT, contracts. An allowance made upon prompt payment in the purchase of goods; it is also the interest allowed in advancing money upon bills of exchange, or other negotiable securities due at a future time And to discount, signifies the act of buying a bill of exchange, or promissory note for a less sum than that which upon its face, is payable.
     2. Among merchants, the term used when a bill of exchange is transferred, is, that the bill is sold, and not that it is discounted. See Poth. De l'Usure, n. 128 3 Pet. R. 40.

References in periodicals archive ?
The high quality image of the Albert Heijn private-label ranges helps differentiate the chain's positioning from more value-orientated rivals including the discounter chains Aldi and Lidl, which are both powerful in grocery retailing in the Netherlands.
Five trades that might cost you $350 in commissions at Charles Schwab might cost $125-$150 at deep discounters such as Dreyfus Brokerage, Brown & Co.
Another discounter just trying to do what Aldi is doing"--Graeme Seabrook, managing director of Kwik Save[20]; Netto targeted the discount market "with no intention of taking the multiples head on in any form of retailing battle"[21].
It isn't unusual for discounters to sell 50 to 100 times normal shelf sales with big promotions, he says.
Hard discounters Aldi and Lidl left the supermarkets for dust growth-wise in the 12 weeks ending 17 April 2011, with year-on-year sales increases of 15% and 14.
TORONTO--The successful entry into Canada of discounters demonstrates the lure of value here, according to a new report from Standard & Poor's corporate rating department.
For cosmetics 35% of Glamour readers most frequently turn to department stores, compared with the 30% who most often patronize discounters and the 19% who favor drug stores.
That confirmation, however, was reversed on appeal last month, because Vornado, Bradlees' landlord, objected to a provision in the plan allowing the discounter another year to decide whether to assume or reject its lease interest even though it was planning on exiting the bankruptcy proceedings at the end of this month.
She pointed out that Sears hasn't become a discounter, continuing to offer its wide variety of appliances, tools and clothes, and that it continues to focus more on quality than price points.
In the world of fast-moving consumer goods like soap and shampoo, a 'new order' is on the rise: Traditional retailers may soon be overtaken by e-commerce and discounters because of their promise of convenience and affordability.
THE major supermarkets have suffered their biggest sales dip for more than a year, while the discounters now control a 10th of Britain's grocery market, new research shows.