discount

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discount

n. the payment of less than the full amount due on a promissory note or price for goods or services. Usually a discount is by agreement, and includes the common situation in which a holder of a long-term promissory note or material goods will sell it/them for less than face value in order to get cash now---the difference is the discount.

discount

noun abatement, allowance, amount deeucted, bargain, decessio, decrease, decrement, deductio, deduction, diminution, lower price, markdown, reduction, special price, subtraction
Associated concepts: discount a loan, discount bills, discount notes, trade discount

discount

(Disbelieve), verb be indifferent to, belittle, brush aside, decessio, deductio, depreciate, discredit, disdain, disesteem, disparage, disregard, distrust, doubt, gloss over, harbor suspicions, ignore, make light of, misprize, mistrust, pass over, pay no attention, pay no heed, pay no mind, question, slight, spurn, suspect

discount

(Minimize), verb abate, abbreviate, abridge, allay, attenuate, condense, curtail, deflate, detract, diminish, lessen, minimalize, pare, reduce, render less, scale down, shorten, underestimate, understate, undervalue

discount

(Reduce), verb abate, allow a margin, cut, decrease, deduct from, depreciate, detract, lower, lower the sale price, make allowance for, mark down, rebate, reeuce the mark-up, sell below par, slash prices, strike off, subduct, subtract, take from, take off, underprice, undersell, undervalue
See also: brokerage, deduct, deduction, depreciate, diminution, discredit, disparage, drawback, except, exclude, lessen, minimize, rebate, reduce, refund, reject

DISCOUNT, practice. A set off, or defalcation in an action. Vin. Ab. h.t. DISCOUNT, contracts. An allowance made upon prompt payment in the purchase of goods; it is also the interest allowed in advancing money upon bills of exchange, or other negotiable securities due at a future time And to discount, signifies the act of buying a bill of exchange, or promissory note for a less sum than that which upon its face, is payable.
     2. Among merchants, the term used when a bill of exchange is transferred, is, that the bill is sold, and not that it is discounted. See Poth. De l'Usure, n. 128 3 Pet. R. 40.

References in periodicals archive ?
The other big thorn in the side of the discounters has been the collapse of non-food sales, which used to account for about a quarter of their sales.
Good Housekeeping consumer director Caroline Bloor said: "The current battle between the traditional supermarkets and the discounters is pulling prices down - and will continue to do so.
As the largest local discounter, Migros has recorded a resilient performance in 2009 with its Denner chain and is resisting successfully the onslaught of the newcomers Aldi and Lidl.
Their success also underscores how ineffectual attempts by the likes of Tesco to take them on with their own discounter ranges -focused on price rather than quality--have been.
While a toy store has room for a variety of products, discounters like Wal-Mart and Target offer only a few aisles.
Hypermarket, Supermarket, and Discounters in France increased at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 0.
The data showed the supermarkets had achieved what they had set out to do - claw back their market share from the discounters, albeit at the expense of profitability, said David Swales, market intelligence manager at DairyCo.
Heilig-Meyers operates 1,246 stores: 815 as Heilig-Meyers, 229 as Mattress Discounters, 101 as Rhodes, 69 as the RoomStore and 32 in Puerto Rico as Berrios.
Most discounters require minimum amounts to open an account, usually $1,000, $5,000 or $10,000.