discount

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discount

n. the payment of less than the full amount due on a promissory note or price for goods or services. Usually a discount is by agreement, and includes the common situation in which a holder of a long-term promissory note or material goods will sell it/them for less than face value in order to get cash now---the difference is the discount.

discount

noun abatement, allowance, amount deeucted, bargain, decessio, decrease, decrement, deductio, deduction, diminution, lower price, markdown, reduction, special price, subtraction
Associated concepts: discount a loan, discount bills, discount notes, trade discount

discount

(Disbelieve), verb be indifferent to, belittle, brush aside, decessio, deductio, depreciate, discredit, disdain, disesteem, disparage, disregard, distrust, doubt, gloss over, harbor suspicions, ignore, make light of, misprize, mistrust, pass over, pay no attention, pay no heed, pay no mind, question, slight, spurn, suspect

discount

(Minimize), verb abate, abbreviate, abridge, allay, attenuate, condense, curtail, deflate, detract, diminish, lessen, minimalize, pare, reduce, render less, scale down, shorten, underestimate, understate, undervalue

discount

(Reduce), verb abate, allow a margin, cut, decrease, deduct from, depreciate, detract, lower, lower the sale price, make allowance for, mark down, rebate, reeuce the mark-up, sell below par, slash prices, strike off, subduct, subtract, take from, take off, underprice, undersell, undervalue
See also: brokerage, deduct, deduction, depreciate, diminution, discredit, disparage, drawback, except, exclude, lessen, minimize, rebate, reduce, refund, reject

DISCOUNT, practice. A set off, or defalcation in an action. Vin. Ab. h.t. DISCOUNT, contracts. An allowance made upon prompt payment in the purchase of goods; it is also the interest allowed in advancing money upon bills of exchange, or other negotiable securities due at a future time And to discount, signifies the act of buying a bill of exchange, or promissory note for a less sum than that which upon its face, is payable.
     2. Among merchants, the term used when a bill of exchange is transferred, is, that the bill is sold, and not that it is discounted. See Poth. De l'Usure, n. 128 3 Pet. R. 40.

References in periodicals archive ?
It's wrong to characterize what's happening as something completely new, because discounters have been ever present in my 30-year career, and there have been times when they've had significantly larger market share than they have today," he said, adding that discounters had a share of about 12% in the early 1990s, compared with 7.
85 percent of discount shoppers plan to continue using discounters even after their personal financial circumstances improve--indicating that although the current boom may have been partly triggered by tough economic conditions, the sector should remain buoyant even after the economy returns to growth
Carrefour and Tesco's private-label strategies in France and the UK respectively have been particularly adapted with a view to compete more effectively against discounters.
To grow their top-line revenues, discounters will have to identify innovative ways to attract new customers and increase share-of-wallet among established clientele.
Mattress Firm executives have not commented on their plans for Mattress Discounters, or on any future plans.
In 2001, food discounters boosted their sales by 10%, and a similar rate was expected for 2002.
In late June, the FTC warned Matsushita against urging wholesalers and retailers not to sell its products to discounters that cut prices by as much as 30%.
Five trades that might cost you $350 in commissions at Charles Schwab might cost $125-$150 at deep discounters such as Dreyfus Brokerage, Brown & Co.
2) The impact of the new discounters -- a case study.
Many discounters depend on in-and-out promotions of deal items, but the trend has been to regular purchases, with some chains devoting as many as three gondolas to food in their bigger stores.
Discounters such as Aldi, Lidl, Netto, and Penny are expanding rapidly and eating away the market share of traditional supermarkets
Almost a third (31%) of shoppers say they will use discounters such as Aldi and Lidl more this year, the latest IGD ShopperVista poll found.