discredit


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Related to discredit: discount

discredit

noun animadversion, aspersion, attaint, baseness, castigation, censure, condemnation, contumely, criticism, debasement, dedecus, degradation, derogation, disapprobation, disapproval, disbelief, disesteem, disfavor, disgrace, dishonor, disparagement, dispraise, disreputability, disrepute, distrust, ignominia, impaired reputation, imputation, incredulity, infamy, ingloriousness, lack of confidence, lack of esseem, loss of belief, loss of credence, loss of credit, loss of repute, mistrust, odium, opprobrium, probrum, reflection, remonstrance, reprehension, reproach, reprobation, revilement, scandal, shame, slur, stain, stigma, stricture, taint, tarnish, turpitude
Associated concepts: discredit a witness

discredit

verb abrogare, asperse, besmirch, brand, bring disgrace upon, bring into disfavor, bring reproach upon, cast aspersions on, cast shame upon, debase, decry, degrade, denigrate, deprecate, depreciate, deprive of credit, derogate from, discount, disgrace, disparage, downgrade, hold up to shame, impair the reputation of, impute shame to, injure the credit of, involvein shame, make distasteful, malign, reflect dishonor upon, reprehend, scandalize, stain, stigmatize, taint, tarnish
Associated concepts: discredit a witness, discredited witness
See also: accuse, attaint, bad character, bad repute, blame, brand, cavil, cite, condemn, condemnation, contemn, debase, decry, defame, degradation, demean, denounce, deprecate, depreciate, derogate, disaccord, disallow, disapprove, disavow, disbelieve, discommend, discount, disfavor, disgrace, dishonor, disparage, disprove, doubt, humiliate, ignominy, impeach, impeachability, impugn, incredulity, infamy, lessen, libel, negate, notoriety, obloquy, onus, opprobrium, pillory, refuse, refute, reject, reproach, scandal, shame, smear, stain, stigma, sully, suspicion, tarnish, underestimate

TO DISCREDIT, practice, evidence. To deprive one of credit or confidence.
     2. In general, a party may discredit a witness called by the opposite party, who testifies against him, by proving that his character is such as not to entitle him to credit or confidence, or any other fact which shows he is not, entitled to belief. It is clearly settled, also, that the party voluntarily calling a witness, cannot afterwards impeach his character for truth and veracity. 1 Moo. & Rob. 414; 3 B. & Cress. 746; S. C. 10 Eng. Com. Law R. 220. But if a party calls a witness, who turns out unfavorable, he may call another to prove the same point. 2 Campb. R. 556 2 Stark. R. 334; S. C. 3 E. C. L. R. 371 1 Nev & Man. 34; 4 B. & Adolph. 193; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 47; 1 Phil. Ev. 229; Rosc. Civ. Ev. 96.

References in classic literature ?
Little by little he changed his tone when speaking of his "friend," whom Long Jack had christened "the Crazy Kid," "the Gilt-edged Baby," "the Suckin' Vanderpoop," and other pet names; and with his sea-booted feet cocked up on the table would even invent histories about silk pajamas and specially imported neckwear, to the "friend's" discredit.
She had been repeatedly very earnest in trying to get Anne included in the visit to London, sensibly open to all the injustice and all the discredit of the selfish arrangements which shut her out, and on many lesser occasions had endeavoured to give Elizabeth the advantage of her own better judgement and experience; but always in vain: Elizabeth would go her own way; and never had she pursued it in more decided opposition to Lady Russell than in this selection of Mrs Clay; turning from the society of so deserving a sister, to bestow her affection and confidence on one who ought to have been nothing to her but the object of distant civility.
It is a shameful and unblessed thing, to take the scum of people, and wicked condemned men, to be the people with whom you plant; and not only so, but it spoileth the plantation; for they will ever live like rogues, and not fall to work, but be lazy, and do mischief, and spend victuals, and be quickly weary, and then certify over to their country, to the discredit of the plantation.
You are ready enough to use all the information that the police can lay at your disposal, and then you try to finish the case yourself and bring discredit on them.
Having long discredited the old systems of mysticism, he now began to discredit the old appraisements of morality.
Caddy was quite transported by this reply of mine, being, I believe, as susceptible to the least kindness or encouragement as any tender heart that ever beat in this world; and after another turn or two round the garden, during which she put on an entirely new pair of gloves and made herself as resplendent as possible that she might do no avoidable discredit to the Master of Deportment, we went to Newman Street direct.
Thorpe, for she not only longed to be dancing, but was likewise aware that, as the real dignity of her situation could not be known, she was sharing with the scores of other young ladies still sitting down all the discredit of wanting a partner.
However this may discredit such persons with the judicious, it helps them with the people, as it gives heat, pungency, and publicity to their words.
Samuel Ferguson, one of her most glorious sons, will not reflect discredit on his origin.
There is a singular fascination in watching the eagerness with which the learned author ferrets out every circumstance which may throw discredit on his hero.
He reflected, with much probability on his side, that Lydgate would by-and-by be caught tripping too, and that his ungentlemanly attempts to discredit the sale of drugs by his professional brethren, would by-and-by recoil on himself.
She compared Tennyson, and Browning, and her favorite prose masters with him, and to his hopeless discredit.